Volume: 30.2
Year: 2015

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:

Year 2016 Volume 31 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 3
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 1
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 3
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 1

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
ADAPTING CREATIVE AND RELAXATION ACTIVITIES TO STUDENTS WITH CANCER 2015 30 2 291 KB
Nika Jenko Mojca Lipec Stopar University of Ljubljana

The team which forms a comprehensive treatment plan for students with cancer includes, among other experts, special educators. In cooperation with other team members, their role is to enable students to integrate in the educational process, having regard to their individual needs. In the present paper we introduce the study of specific methodical and didactic adaptations which special educators have to consider when planning creative and relaxation activities for students with cancer. Within the research, a multiple case study was carried out. It included various primary and secondary qualitative research methods. The study included three children aged from 7 to 13, treated for cancer during their hospitalization. The data obtained on the sample showed that planning and implementing creative and relaxation activities demand a lot of resourcefulness and flexibility on the part of the special educators. Due to the nature of the problem, particular methodical and didactic adaptations, different from that in other groups of students with special needs, have to be taken into account. Apart from the students' characteristics, various factors, which are a result of the illness, treatment and hospital environment, have to be considered when planning the activities. The results of the study represent a contribution of knowledge to the field of methodology of working with children with long-term illnesses and aim to facilitate planning of support for the children with cancer.... [more]


BRIEF REPORT: AN EVALUATION OF AN AUSTRALIAN AUTISM-SPECIFIC, EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAMME 2015 30 2 187 KB
Jessica M. Paynter Emma P. Riley AEIOU Foundation Wendi Beamish Griffith University James G. Scott The University of Queensland Helen S. Heussler Mater Research Institute-UQ

There is a relative paucity of evidence examining the effectiveness of early intervention for young children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, in particular those delivered through educationally-based programmes. This study aimed to evaluate the real world effectiveness of a community-based autism-specific early learning and intervention programme in Australia. Children enrolled between February 2010 and May 2013 who had a diagnosis of an Autism Spectrum Disorder was eligible to participate in the study. Fifty-nine children with a mean age of 3.98 years participated. Cognitive ability, language, autistic symptoms, and motor skills were assessed at baseline and follow up (12 months or at programme exit) using standardised measures. Pre- and post-measures were compared using paired sample t-tests. Significant improvements were found in receptive and expressive language, autism symptoms, and overall adaptive behaviour. No significant change was found in motor skills. Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder attending the community-based programme had significant gains particularly in domains of cognition and language. Study limitations are discussed.... [more]


CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION: A CASE STUDY OF ONE MOTHER'S EXPERIENCES 2015 30 2 349 KB
Sherry L. Steeley Georgetown University Karrin Lukacs Shenandoah University

Special education services have seen great improvement since the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities in Education Act (IDEA) in 1975, but culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) families still face exceptional challenges when advocating for special education services for their children (Artiles & Harry, 2006; Palawat & May, 2011). Beyond language barriers, school culture and the special education system are often challenging to navigate, and cultural misunderstandings may lead to over-representation or the provision of services that fail to meet children's needs (Artiles & Harry, 2006; Palawat & May, 2011). This study investigates the case of one such family across several school districts and early intervention settings to identify areas of success and shortfalls, in order to contribute to research on critical needs for further improvements in special education relationships and services for CLD families.... [more]


DO HIGH ABILITY LEARNERS ENJOY LEARNING ALONE OR IN GROUPS? IT DEPENDS…. 2015 30 2 498 KB
Lannie Kanevsky Simon Fraser University

Pedagogical shifts favouring collaborative learning and findings of recent studies have raised concerns regarding the claim that gifted students prefer to learn alone. The purpose of this study was to further investigate if, when and how high ability learners want to work with or without others. The distributions of 416 high ability students (n=416; Gr. 3-8) responses to survey items were analyzed. Items assessed their general feelings about working alone and in a group and the appeal of specific conditions. Although a majority indicated they enjoyed learning alone, more also enjoyed group work-under certain conditions. Age differences were found but none related to gender. More of the younger students enjoyed teaching their peers while more of the older students were eager to contribute to group discussions and be seated in clusters. Sitting alone became increasingly unpopular with older students. The broad variability in the distribution of students' ratings across conditions demonstrated the preferences of high ability learners are sensitive to many factors in the setting, not just the involvement of others. High ability learners may prefer to work alone when attractive conditions for working in groups are not available. Evidence-based guidelines for group work are offered.... [more]


DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, RISKY FAMILY ENVIRONMENT AND CHILDREN: A BIO-PSYCHOLOGY PERSPECTIVE 2015 30 2 463 KB
Olusegun Emmanuel Afolabi University of Botswana

Though a large body of research has investigated the impacts of domestic violence on adult victims only few studies have been devoted to the exposure of children to probable inter-spousal trauma that disrupt their neurological and biochemical pathways in development. The aim of this paper is to analyse the current empirical research that discusses the biological and psychological inference of domestic violence and risky family environment on children's health. In realizing this objective, the paper used the ecological framework to explain the interaction effects of bio- psychological processes on emotional regulation and social competence skills of children living in a domestic violence and risky family environment. Finally, the study shows that a risky and harsh early family environment exacerbates disturbances in children' physiological and neuro-endocrine responses to stress, and also has long-term adverse implications on their mental health.... [more]


INCLUSION OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN FORMAL VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN ETHIOPIA 2015 30 2 327 KB
Abebe Yehualawork Malle Raija Pirttimaa Timo Saloviita University of Jyvaskyla

In Ethiopia, individuals with disabilities have limited access to educational and vocational training opportunities. This study investigates prevailing challenges and opportunities for the participation of students with disabilities in vocational education programs in Ethiopia. Data for the study were gathered from the five biggest regions out of the 11 in the country by selecting two colleges of technical and vocational education from each region. A total of 110 trainers and 28 students with disabilities from the selected colleges completed the questionnaire. In addition, 30 regional and college-level administrators were interviewed. Finally, all 10 colleges were evaluated through direct observation in terms of the accessibility of their physical environments. The results revealed significant barriers that limited full participation of students with disabilities, such as lack of adaptive educational materials and facilities, lack of trained trainers, and systematic exclusion of students with disabilities. The results are discussed with a focus on the need for continued improvement of vocational and technical education considering international and national strategies that endorse the rights of people with disabilities. ... [more]


JAMES M. KAUFFMAN’S IDEAS ABOUT SPECIAL EDUCATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR EDUCATING CULTURALLY AND LINGUISTICALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS 2015 30 2 471 KB
Lynn Tetzloff Red Apple Elementary School Festus E. Obiakor Valdosta State University

For decades, James M. Kauffman has been a reputable scholar in the field of special education. While his contributions to the field cannot be doubted, his ideas about special education have been somewhat controversial and even devastating to the education of culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) learners with and without disabilities. Specifically, his ideas about student labeling, standardized tests and testing, multicultural education, and disproportionate placement of CLD learners seem inconceivable and counterproductive. We respect Kauffman as a renowned scholar and we do not doubt his heart, however, we are unclear if he is aware of the negative consequences of his ideas. In this article, we critique his ideas based on his writings on some critical issues in special education.... [more]


JOB ATTITUDES OF SPECIAL EDUCATORS RELATED TO INCLUSION OF STUDENTS WITH SIGNIFICANT DISABILITIES 2015 30 2 502 KB
Mary Pearson University of Central Arkansas Beth Clavenna-Deane Kayla Supon Carter University of Kansas

This study measured the attitudes of teachers of students with significant disabilities using the Attitudes of Teachers of Students with Significant Disabilities about Aspects of Their Jobs survey. Teachers who worked with at least one student with significant disabilities were contacted via e-mail and other on-line means across four geographical areas in the United States. The survey results were compared with the teacher's reported rates of student inclusion and geographical areas. The post - hoc analysis produced significant results, displaying that teachers whose students were included in general education were more likely to display positive overall attitudes related to their jobs. Teachers in suburban and rural areas with students included more fully were more likely to display positive attitudes towards their job design. These results expand the field of inclusion research from having positive impact on students, to demonstrating a significant relationship between increased rates of inclusion and positive teacher attitudes toward aspects of their job.... [more]


MULTIMEDIA STORYBOOKS: SUPPORTING VOCABULARY FOR STUDENTS WHO ARE DEAF/HARD-OF-HEARING 2015 30 2 410 KB
Vicki Donne Robert Morris University Margaret L. Briley Youngstown State University

A single case study examined the use of multimedia storybooks on the vocabulary acquisition of 7 preschool students who are deaf/hard of hearing in two classrooms at a school for the deaf in the U.S. Participants also included 3 speech-language pathologists. Students spent an average of 7.1 minutes daily working with the multimedia storybooks and results indicated that the average vocabulary words independently identified correctly in isolation and in the context of sentences doubled over the course of the study (5 weeks). Differentiated instruction was provided through the use of three levels of storybooks and 6 of the students benefited from this differentiated instruction. Results indicated that increased vocabulary development may be supported by the use of multimedia storybooks.... [more]


PERCEPTIONS OF KOREAN PRE-SERVICE SPECIAL EDUCATORS REGARDING TEACHING COMPETENCIES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES 2015 30 2 373 KB
Yu-Ri Kim Jiyeon Park Suk-Hyang Lee Ewha Womans University

The purpose of this study is to develop a Teaching competency index in special education and to investigate Korean pre-service special educators (PSSEs)’ perceptions regarding each item of the index. Based on a review of the literature on exemplary instruction in special education, we developed an index composed of 44 items. The six sub-domains of the index include ‘Organizing content’, ‘Writing lesson plans’, ‘Considering individual characteristics’, ‘Encouraging student participation’, ‘Enhancing interactions’, ‘Practicing effective teaching strategies’ and ‘Reflecting on one’s own teaching’. The survey participants included 37 PSSEs who just completed their practicum in special schools in Korea for four weeks. Results showed that there was a significant difference between the importance and implementation of the teaching competencies both in the total score and in the subtotal score of each domain. No significant difference was found across three certification areas (early childhood, elementary, and secondary) of PSSEs and across the disability types of the students who attend the practicum sites. Finally, discussions of the results and the implications of this study for personnel preparation practices in Korea are provided. ... [more]


THE LEARNING EXPERIENCES OF STUDENTS WITH DYSLEXIA IN A GREEK HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTION 2015 30 2 105 KB
Dr. Aglaia Stampoltzis Special Education Teacher Department of Pedagogical Studies ASPETE Elisavet Tsitsou Primary School Teacher Helen Plesti Headteacher Rani Kalouri Professor Department of Pedagogical Studies ASPETE

Dyslexia is the most common declared disability at universities which primarily affects reading, writing, speed of processing and organization. Many students with dyslexia have invisible difficulties that require different types of accommodations. The aim of this study is to give voice to the learning experiences of ten students with dyslexia in a Greek university. In depth interviews were conducted to record students’ views and perceptions about teaching, learning and assessment in higher education. Five areas were identified as being the source of most concern for participants: disclosure of dyslexia, access to information, implementation of the law, awareness of staff, lack of inclusive instructional practices. The present research lends insight into how individuals with dyslexia will be able to fulfill their intellectual potential and participate in higher education as any other able and motivated adult with the adoption of a ‘social model’ of dyslexia.... [more]


SUPPORTING INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: NEGOTIATING HOME-SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP IN SINGAPORE 2015 30 2 332 KB
Meng Ee Wong Zi Jia NG Kenneth Poon National Institute of Education

While there has been growing theoretical and policy interest in the areas of home-school partnership and inclusive education, relatively little work has linked the two fields. Where there have been studies, these have focused primarily on parent or school perspective. With inclusive education in its nascent stage in Singapore, this study examines the different roles emerging from home and school as well as factors underpinning this partnership. Data was drawn from interviews with 13 parents and 30 school staff. Our findings indicate that home-school partnership is a work in progress that is continually subject to home and school dynamics. The expectations and perceptions of parents and educators must be taken into consideration if the partnership is to succeed and sustain. Support from the wider community creates a synergy which reinforces home-school partnership and increases the visibility of children with disabilities by turning a private concern into a shared societal issue.... [more]


TECHNOLOGIES THAT FACILITATE THE STUDY OF ADVANCED MATHEMATICS BY STUDENTS WHO ARE BLIND: TEACHERS’ PERSPECTIVES 2015 30 2 530 KB
Vicki M. DePountis Rona L. Pogrund Nora Griffin-Shirley William Y. Lan Texas Tech University

This research examined the perspectives of teachers of students with visual impair-ments (TVIs) regarding the use and effectiveness of electronic assistive technology (EAT) purported to assist students who are blind in advanced mathematics subjects. The data for this study were collected via an online survey distributed to a convenience sample of teachers with experience teaching or supporting students who are braille readers in advanced mathematics classes. Questions were designed to gain information regarding which of 35 tools presented in the instrument were used to aid students, how were they used and perceived effectiveness. Open-ended response areas provided space for addition of tools not already listed, as well as other feedback. A total of 82 surveys were analyzed. Results indicated that 20 of the 35 devices were used; of these, 13 were used regardless of specific subject, while different sets were used for different subjects and tasks. Participants recommended another seven high-tech devices in the open response question. Limitations of the study were the small sample size and possible survey fatigue. Implications for practitioners: This research provides a foundation for additional work on how to best equip teachers of students with visual impairments so they can support their students.... [more]


WHERE DO MEXICO AND CHILE STAND ON INCLUSIVE EDUCATION? SHORT TITLE: INCLUSION IN MEXICO AND CHILE 2015 30 2 453 KB
Ismael GarcĂ­a-Cedillo Silvia Romero-Contreras Universidad AutĂłnoma de San Luis PotosĂ­ Liliana Ramos-Abadie Universidad Diego Portales

This paper discusses the background, current situation and challenges of educational integration and inclusive education in Mexico and Chile. These countries obtained similar low results on the academic achievement of their students (Mexico last and Chile second last) among OECD countries; and above average scores, among Latin-American countries. In both countries educational integration began as a consequence of legal changes mandating that students with special educational needs (SEN) be attended in regular schools. School financial systems in Mexico and Chile are very different. In Mexico, educational services are predominantly public, while in Chile the state provides subsidies for students to attend both public and private schools. These differences have had an impact in educational integration procedures. In Mexico, students with special educational needs are served by special education professionals affiliated to the schools. In Chile, school principals hire, with the subvention provided by the government, specialists to offer support to the students enrolled. In both countries, educational integration has benefited integrated students. However, many adjustments still need to be made in both countries in order to install more adequate inclusive processes. ... [more]