Volume: 25.3
Year: 2010

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:

Year 2016 Volume 31 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 3
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 1
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 3
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 1

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
AD/HD HEALTH RELATED QUALITY OF LIFE QUESTIONNAIRE COMPLETED BY CHILDREN OR ADOLESCENTS 2010 25 3 156 KB
Deborah Erickson, Simon Clarke, Michael Kohn Lock Haven University, Westmead Hospital, NSW, Children´s Hospital, Westmead, NSW

Assessing health-related quality of life (HQOL) for children or adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) to corroborate a diagnosis and monitor treatment outcomes, is usually relegated to parent, teacher and physician observation of the child/adolescent. Allowing adults to act as proxy reporters for children/adolescents increases the bias and contributes to subjective evaluation of the child/adolescent´s HQOL. This article describes the development and validation of a HQOL scale that children or adolescents can complete themselves. The areas assessed included relationships with friends and family, reactions to medication, school achievement and ability to focus and attend. A factor analysis used to achieve construct validation yielded a 21 item scale. Reliability and criterion validation results were determined to be adequate. This new, short, self-report AD/HD HQOL scale for children and adolescents can be administered in a school setting or a physician´s office by administrative staff to support other AD/HD assessment measures and monitor treatment outcomes.... [more]


THE INFLUENCE OF PARENTS ON THE FORMATION OF PSYCHOLOGICAL NEEDS OF TEENAGERS WITH DISABILITY 2010 25 3 179 KB
Joanna Konarska Pedagogical University of Cracow, Poland

The cognitive aim of this research is to examine the level of intensity of needs in the case of teenagers with visual impairments, compared with their able-bodied peers, as well as participation of parents in formation of these needs. The practical aim of the study is to consider the acquired knowledge in programs of early rehabilitation and helping parents who are an indispensable link in the process of need formation for a child.... [more]


DOWN SYNDROME AND AUTOMATIC PROCESSING OF FAMILIAR AND UNFAMILIAR EMOTIONAL FACES 2010 25 3 354 KB
Guadalupe E. Morales, Ernesto O. Lopez Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon

Participants with Down syndrome (DS) were required to participate in a face recognition experiment to recognize familiar (DS faces) and unfamiliar emotional faces (non DS faces), by using an affective priming paradigm. Pairs of emotional facial stimuli were presented (one face after another) with a short Stimulus Onset Asynchrony of 300 milliseconds and Inter stimulus Interval ISI set up to 50 milliseconds. The goal was to test the hypothesis that recognition deficits on negative information reported by academic literature on this population does not apply to automatic emotional processing specially to meaningful negative information (familiar faces). Results showed that not all of the participants have a recognition deficit on negative stimuli and interestingly, positive familiar faces could not be primed by other valenced facial stimuli. However, positive familiar faces were recognized faster than neutral faces. Educational and clinical implications are discussed at the end of the paper.... [more]


GENERAL EDUCATION TEACHERS NEED TO BE PREPARED TO CO-TEACH THE INCREASING NUMBER OF CHILDREN WITH AUTISM IN INCLUSIVE SETTINGS 2010 25 3 122 KB
Vito Loiacono, Valerie Valenti Long Island University, Eastern Suffolk BOCES

The sustained increase in the number of children diagnosed with autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has become a widespread concern throughout the US as well as globally. Federal mandates (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act [IDEA], 2004; No Child Left Behind [NCLB]) have directed state education departments and local educational agencies (LEAs) to address the pedagogical needs of these children in the least restrictive environments, namely, inclusive classroom settings. It has been reported that most teachers graduate from university teacher preparation programs with minimum training in evidence-based practices for children diagnosed with autism. Consequently, educators continue to be challenged to learn disability-specific teaching skills that are grounded in the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) to address meeting the learning needs of these students. This study examines: (a) the increase of children diagnosed with autism in the Southeastern region of NY over a five year period (2003-2007); and (b) the number of ABA trained general education teachers in this region who co-teach in inclusive classrooms that include children classified with autism. The findings of this study recommend future research be empirically conducted in: (a) comparing the various ABA methodologies to determine the efficacy of each intervention with children classified with ASD; and (b) revising preparatory programs for teachers in higher education to include ABA methodologies to prepare educators to teach children with ASD in inclusive settings. Based on the research findings, institutions of higher education should continue to examine their course of study for all educators and revise their respective curricula to include ABA intervention methodologies which would ultimately benefit not only children classified with autism but other disability categories as well.... [more]


INCLUSIVE EDUCATION POLICY IMPLEMENTATION: IMPLICATIONS FOR TEACHER WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT IN TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO 2010 25 3 141 KB
Christopher J. Johnstone University of Minnesota

This manuscript examines results from a national survey of teachers in Trinidad and Tobago. Data from this study were derived from a national survey conducted by the consulting firm Miske Witt and Associates for the Trinidad and Tobago Ministry of Education. The aim of the survey was to solicit broad-based perspectives on teachers´ knowledge and attitudes about inclusive education. Items for the survey were constructed on consultation from Ministry requests for information about the knowledge, attitudes, and resources available to teachers - specifically related to students with disabilities.Through descriptive and regression analyses, data provide insights into teacher preparation and professional development priorities. Among them, further training for general education teachers on how to help students with disabilities succeed in mainstream environments.... [more]


INCLUSION CLASSROOMS AND TEACHERS: A SURVEY OF CURRENT PRACTICES 2010 25 3 161 KB
Lisa Kilanowski-Press, Chandra J. Foote, Vince J. Rinaldo Niagara University

This study investigates the current state of inclusion practices in general education classrooms via survey of 71 inclusion teachers currently serving as special educators across the state of New York. Specifically, small group instruction, co-teaching, one-to-one instruction, and planning support are explored in relationship to class size, number of students with disabilities, and severity of disability. The qualifications, strengths, and professional development experiences of inclusion teachers based on their reported years of teaching experience, preparatory course work, and professional development opportunities are examined. Finally, information on common forms of assistance including consultant special education teachers, teacher assistants, and classroom volunteers are documented. Quantitative analysis of survey responses indicate great variability among the inclusion practices employed in general education classrooms. Co-teaching, though frequently cited as the most beneficial model of inclusive practice, emerged as the least documented method of instruction, with the utilization of consultant teacher models emerging as the most prevalent. Endorsement of the use volunteer support was found to be the second most common support mechanism employed within inclusive classrooms. Few differences in the types of supports employed were found across population densities. Findings highlight the heterogeneity of current inclusion practices, and bear implications in terms of future research examining the qualifications of support staff assisting students with special needs, such as volunteers, and the overall efficacy of inclusion practices in general.... [more]


INSIDE PRACTICE OF SCIENCE TEACHERS FOR STUDENTS WITH HEARING IMPAIRMENTS IN BOTSWANA PRIMARY SCHOOLS 2010 25 3 158 KB
Sourav Mukhopadhyay, Emmanuel Moswela University of Botswana

In this qualitative study the authors describe how students with severe to profound hearing impairments learn science subjects in primary school in Botswana. Twenty-two teachers from two centres of deaf education in Botswana were recruited purposively to take part in the current study. Multilayered data collection methods were utilized to gain an understanding of classroom practice of science teaching. A constant comparison method was employed to analyse the data. Findings revealed four themes that highlighted the experiences of science teaching. These include curriculum related issues, language related issues, and resources related issues, and teaching methods. Through this study, the investigators gained an insight of current practices of science education in primary schools in Botswana for students with hearing impairments. The findings of this study could shape policy on educational support for students with hearing impairments and provide a framework for alternate assessment for learners with hearing impairment.... [more]


THAI COLLEGE STUDENTS´ PERCEPTIONS ON ROLES AND FUNCTIONS OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS 2010 25 3 249 KB
Kamonwan Tangdhanakanond, Teara Archwamety Chulalongkorn University, University of Nebraska at Kearney

The purpose of the present study was to examine Thai college students´ perceptions of school psychologist´s roles and functions. Participants were 164 undergraduate students in the Faculty of Education at a Thai university. A questionnaire was employed to collect the data. It was found that college students majoring in secondary education rated all roles/functions as significantly more important than those majoring in elementary education (p .01) on who they thought should perform the various roles and functions of an unavailable school psychologist. Implications of the findings were also presented in this article... [more]


CULTURAL BELIEFS REGARDING PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES IN NAMIBIA: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE INCLUSION OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES 2010 25 3 181 KB
Cynthy Haihambo, Elizabeth Lightfoot University of Namibia, University of Minnesota

Namibia is a southern African country with national level policies promoting community inclusion and inclusive education. Despite these policies, people with disabilities are often excluded from schools and community life. This study explores the nuanced cultural beliefs about the causes of disability in Namibia, and the impacts of such beliefs on the implementation of disability policy. Eight themes emerged from this study regarding specific myths about the causes of disability and appropriate community responses to people with disabilities. This study finds that many Namibians believe in supernatural causes of disability, such as witchcraft, and/or in the role of improper relationships of family members as causes of disability; and that community responses to Namibians with disabilities are often negative. However, many people, particularly parents with disabilities, often have strong positive views of disability as well, reflecting the complex and changing nature of cultural beliefs. This study suggests that the implementation of disability inclusion policies is more likely to be successful if it builds upon positive aspects of cultural beliefs about disability.... [more]


MODELLING THE INFLUENCE OF TEACHER CHARACTERISTICS ON STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT FOR CANADIAN STUDENTS WITH AND WITHOUT LEARNING DISABILITIES 2010 25 3 240 KB
Jessica Whitley University of Ottawa

The present study explored the relationships between teacher characteristics and the academic achievement of students with and without Learning Disabilities (LD) in a path model. Teacher-related variables included teacher self-efficacy, expectations of students´ educational attainment, level of education and years of experience. Data were drawn from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth and participants included students in grades one through six who were taught by a single teacher (N = 2367). Results indicated that the hypothesized path model was an excellent fit to the data. Furthermore, academic achievement was significantly impacted by teacher expectations, LD status, and teacher efficacy. Teachers felt less confident in their ability to instruct students with LD, had lower expectations of their long-term success and also rated their achievement more poorly. The findings are discussed within existing research and implications for teacher preparation and in-service training programs are presented... [more]


DIFFERENT STRATEGIES FOR EMBRACING INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: A SNAP SHOT OF INDIVIDUAL CASES FROM THREE COUNTRIES 2010 25 3 144 KB
Lee Lay Wah Universiti Sains Malaysia

This paper provides a snapshot into how three individual schools from three different countries practice inclusive education. In the case of the UK primary school, inclusive practices are focused on the provision of external resources and expertise to supplement instruction in the classroom. In the Netherlands, the focus is on teacher change through change of attitude and in-service development of skills. The third case, a Malaysian case, highlights the discrete relationship between special educators and regular teachers in providing inclusive education in their school The research evidence shows that strategies to promote inclusive education is dependent on the current strengths and needs of organizations. Each of these organizations embraces inclusive education by capitalizing on their own strengths. It is proposed that inclusive education be interpreted based on situational contexts and should be broad enough to encompass a continuum of needs. The implication of this is that inclusion is an ongoing developmental process whereby all organizations can continue to develop towards greater inclusion whatever is its present state.... [more]


A PRELIMINARY STUDY: DO ALTERNATIVE CERTIFICATION ROUTE PROGRAMS DEVELOP THE NECESSARY SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE IN ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY? 2010 25 3 215 KB
Sherry Mee. Bell, David F. Cihak, Sharon Judge University of Tennessee, Old Dominion University

A large number of special education teachers in the United States are prepared in alternative certification programs and insufficient empirical information exists regarding their knowledge of assistive technology. The purpose of this study was to conduct a preliminary investigation of alternatively licensed special education teachers´ knowledge, experience, and confidence with assistive technology. One-hundred twenty-three special education teachers who were enrolled in an alternative license program were surveyed. The data indicated a significant positive relation between teachers´ knowledge/usage and their confidence with assistive technology (r = .74; p more]... [more]


SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHER BURNOUT AND ACT 2010 25 3 184 KB
Debra W. Emery, Brian Vandenberg University of Missouri-St. Louis

Special educators are a high risk group, prone to low job satisfaction, low self-efficacy, and increased stress and burnout. The attrition rate of special educators is particularly high, contributing to an overall shortage of qualified teachers throughout the United States. While the problems of special educators are widely discussed in the literature, scant intervention research has targeted this population, and what has been done suffers from design limitations, lack of a guiding theoretical framework, and a focus on symptom reduction, rather than mediating psychological processes. Acceptance and commitment therapeutic (ACT) interventions hold promise for addressing special education teacher burnout... [more]


KNOWLEDGE OF LEARNING DISABILITY AMONG PRE- AND IN-SERVICE TEACHERS IN INDIA 2010 25 3 149 KB
Sheila Saravanabhavan, Rc. Saravanabhavan Virginia State University, Howard University

The purpose of this study was to determine the knowledge level of learning disabilities (LD) among teachers in India. A survey was distributed among 144 teachers in two regular high schools, 38 teachers in two special schools, and 165 pre-service teachers in a teacher education college in a metropolitan city in a southern state in India. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the knowledge level of learning disabilities among teachers working in regular schools was statistically different. Among the three groups, the pre-service teacher group scored the lowest (M = 60.76, SD = 13.36, N = 165) which was below the mean score for the entire group (M = 66.32, SD =13.37, N=347). Teaching experience and familiarity with persons with LD did not affect the knowledge level of the three groups of participants. The study makes recommendations on how to improve the knowledge level of learning disabilities among pre-service teachers in India, and the need to assess knowledge of LD among physicians, parents, paraprofessionals, educational administrators and other stake holders.... [more]


SPECIAL EDUCATION IN SAUDI ARABIA: CHALLENGES, PERSPECTIVES, FUTURE POSSIBILITIES 2010 25 3 140 KB
Turki Alquraini Ohio University

This paper provides a brief background of the education system in Saudi Arabia and current special education services and programs for students with disabilities. Additionally, this paper presents the findings of some studies that examined teachers' perspectives regarding the inclusion of students with disabilities. As Saudi Arabia continues its dramatic period of improvement, changes in special education services will occur rapidly. To improve special education services, educators, parents, policymakers, and other professionals should consider many suggestions regarding critical components of successful inclusive education. In addition, further research is needed on changing the attitudes of stakeholders toward inclusion so they can be supportive of these students in a general education setting... [more]


EVEN IN SWEDEN? EXCLUDING THE INCLUDED: SOME REFLECTIONS ON THE CONSEQUENCES OF NEW POLICIES ON EDUCATIONAL PROCESSES AND OUTCOMES, AND EQUITY IN EDUCATION 2010 25 3 199 KB
Girma Berhanu University of Gothenburg

The purpose of this article is to reflect on the effects of educational reforms (which are guided by a neoliberal political agenda) on educational processes, outcomes, and inclusive education in Sweden. It is focused in particular on the increasing marginalisation and exclusion of students with special educational needs, immigrant students, and socially disadvantaged segments of the population. It sheds light on the mechanism in which the changes are framed: neoliberal philosophies that place greater emphasis on devolution, marketization (driven by principles of cost containment and efficiency), competition, standardization, individual choices and rights, development of new profiles within particular school units, and other factors that potentially work against the values of diversity, equity, and inclusion. I argue here that marginalisation and segregation of socially disadvantaged and ethnic minority groups has increased as a consequence of this new wave of policy measures. Resultant resource differences have widened among schools and municipalities and among pupils. Swedish efforts in the past to promote equity through a variety of educational policies have been fascinating. Those early educational policies, including the macro-political agenda focused on the social welfare model, have helped to diminish the effects of differential social, cultural, and economic background on outcomes. This has come under threat. There is still some hope, however, of mitigating the situation through varied social and educational measures combined with an effective monitoring system and a stronger partnership and transparent working relationship between the central and local government systems. Research and follow-up are crucial in this process.... [more]


ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT OF STEREOTYPIC VOCALIZATIONS IN A TAIWANESE ADOLESCENT WITH AUTISM:A CASE STUDY 2010 25 3 227 KB
Ya-Ping Wu, Pat Mirenda, Hwa-Pey Wang, Ming-Chung Chen National Taiwan Normal University, University of British Columbia, National Chiayi University

This case study describes the processes of functional analysis and modality assessment that were utilized to design a communication intervention for an adolescent with autism who engaged in loud and disruptive vocalizations for most of the school day. The functional analysis suggested that the vocalizations served both tangible and escape functions. The modality assessment suggested that the participant could use a speech-generating device to make requests for a preferred item. Results of the intervention suggested that functional communication training was useful in decreasing the frequency of vocalizations and increasing independent requesting in school and community settings. The results are discussed with regard to their implications for the treatment of stereotypic vocalizations and the limitations of the case study design. We also discuss the importance of international educational efforts related to the dissemination of evidence-based practices such as functional analysis and functional communication training... [more]


BOOK REVIEW - DISABILITY STUDIES, SPECIAL EDUCATION, AND SCHOOL" IN GABEL AND DANFORTH´S DISABILITY & THE POLITICS OF EDUCATION" 2010 25 3 113 KB
Marcy Epstein

Book Review... [more]


Job Opportunity - Assistant Professor Special Education at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse 2010 25 3 102 KB
Carol A. Angell University of Wisconsin-La Crosse

Advert for position at University of Wisconsin-La Crosse... [more]