Volume: 22.2
Year: 2007

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:

Year 2016 Volume 31 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 3
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 1
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 3
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 1

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
PERCEPTIONS OF A PERSON WITH MENTAL RETARDATION AS A FUNCTION OF PARTICIPATION IN INTEGRATED VERSUS SEGREGATED RECREATION/SPORT ACTIVITIES: AN EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS 2007 22 2 57 KB
J. Thomas Kellow, Georgia C. Frey and Dawn Rosser Sandt Mercer University , Indiana University ,University of New Mexico

This study is a conceptual replication of previous work by Storey, Stern, & Parker (1990) that examined the influence of participation in integrated vs. segregated recreation/sports activities on evaluations of a person with mental retardation by persons without a disability. The Storey et al., (1990) study observed that people with mental retardation were viewed less favorably when participating in segregated activities and the current research used an alternate methodological approach to revisit this issue. Eighty participants were randomly assigned to one of two groups. Participants in the first group were exposed to a slide show depicting a young woman engaging in various segregated recreation/sport activities. Participants in the second group saw the same person engaging in integrated recreation/sport activities. The Attitudes Toward Individuals with Severe Handicaps survey served as the outcome measure. Participants evaluated the stimulus person more favorably when she was engaged in integrated as compared to segregated activities; however, the magnitude of these differences was negligible. Future directions for research are discussed.... [more]


EFFECTIVENESS OF COGNITIVE PROCESS APPROACHED SOCIAL SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAM FOR PEOPLE WITH MENTAL RETARDATION 2007 22 2 242 KB
Ilknur ÇIFCI TEKINARSLAN and Bülbin SUCUOGLU Abant Izzet Baysal University, Ankara University

The purpose of this study was to determine whether cognitive-process approach based social skills program was effective on learning and generalizing three social skills (apologizing, coping with teasing and avoiding inappropriate touching) of the nine students with mental retardation. Social skills program covered dimensions of the cognitive process approach which are social coding skills, social decision skills, social performance skills and social evaluation skills to teach targeted social skills. Stories and hand drawn pictures were used during teaching sessions. Social skills training sessions were implemented individually, three times a week. After each training session, generalization sessions were conducted. Training effectiveness was assessed by using one of the single case design approach called multiple probe model with probe condition across subjects. The results of the study indicated the target social skills program based on cognitive process approach was effective for the nine students with mental retardation to acquire targeted social skills and to generalize them.... [more]


CHINESE AND CHINESE-AMERICAN FAMILIES OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES 2007 22 2 62 KB
Linda H. Chiang, & Azar Hadadian Azusa Pacific University, Ball State University

Cultural characteristics impact on parents´ attitudes and perceptions toward children with disabilities. Therefore the unique family background could create a challenge for service providers. Professional who works with children with disabilities need information from families in order to provide effective intervention(Parette, Summer 2004). The purpose of this paper is to review the perception and challenges Chinese-American families of children with disabilities encounter. Specific emphasis was placed on the influence of acculturation of Chinese-American and the intervention of professionals in educational decision making process.... [more]


CONCURRENT AND PREDICTIVE CRITERION-RELATED VALIDITY OF CURRICULUM-BASED MEASUREMENT FOR STUDENTS WITH EMOTIONAL AND/OR BEHAVIORAL DISORDERS 2007 22 2 105 KB
Cecil Fore III, Richard T. Boon and Christopher Martin The University of Georgia

There has been a recent emphasis on improving the academic achievement and performance of students with Emotional and/or Behavioral Disorders (EBD) in content-area classrooms (Spencer, Scruggs, & Mastropieri, 2003). Improving the academic performance of students with EBD is especially important in the current accountability era in which there is much emphasis placed on student´s performance on standardized tests. The purpose of this study was to investigate the concurrent and predictive validity of curriculum-based measurement (CBM) with students with EBD. The Maze (MAZE), Oral Reading Fluency (ORF), and Written Retell (W-Retell) were administered to fifty students´ in grades 6th through 8th to measure their performance compared with the state of Georgia´s Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT) scores. Results indicated significant correlations were found with the MAZE and ORF reading measures and the students´ performance scores on the CRCT. In addition, of the measures used, the Maze explained the most variance in the students CRCT test scores. Finally, limitations of the study, implications for practice for educators, and future research are discussed.... [more]


FACULTY WILLINGNESS TO PROVIDE ACCOMMODATIONS AND COURSE ALTERNATIVES TO POSTSECONDARY STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES 2007 22 2 0 KB
Michael E. Skinner Special Education College of Charleston

The number of students with documented learning disabilities (LD) enrolled in postsecondary settings has increased steadily over the past 20 years. Providing reasonable accommodations significantly increases the probability of success for these students. The present study investigated the willingness of postsecondary instructors to provide accommodations and alternative courses. Results indicated that instructor willingness to provide accommodations and their support of course alternatives varied as a function of school affiliation (e.g., education, mathematics and science, etc.), rank, and specific accommodation requested. Based on the results of this study and previous literature, programmatic suggestions are provided for facilitating the provision of academic adjustments to student with LD in postsecondary settings.... [more]


PSYCHIATRIC DIAGNOSIS AND CONCOMITANT MEDICAL TREATMENT FOR 1st AND 2nd GRADE CHILDREN 2007 22 2 99 KB
La Vonne Cornell-Swanson, William Frankenberger, Krista Bowman and Katie Ley University of Wisconsin

This study examined the proportion of children in 1st and 2nd grade classes who were currently prescribed medication for psychotropic disorders. The study also examined the attitudes of 1st and 2nd grade teachers toward diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and use of psychiatric medication to treat children. Results of the current study indicate that Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) was by far the most prevalent psychiatric disorder (80%) occurring in children in first and second grade. In the current study, approximately 5.6% (172) of the children in the sample were identified as taking one or more psychiatric medications, with 6.9 % of those treated with medication receiving multiple medications. The most prevalent medication being used was stimulants (72.5%) alone or in combination with other medications. Finally, results from the current study revealed that teachers believed medication improved the behavior and learning ability and academic achievement of children in the classroom. These beliefs may result in teacher's acceptance and promotion of treatment with medication.... [more]


PROVISION FOR LEARNERS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS IN BOTSWANA;A SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS 2007 22 2 138 KB
Gareth Dart Molepolole College of Education

This paper considers the support of children with special educational needs in Botswana. A variety of sources including policy documents, literature, statistical data, interviews with key personnel and observation, are used to analyze the context and delivery of provision. Botswana is a middle-income country that has seen rapid economic expansion in a short period of time. Revenue has been used to expand the social sector including education. In the last decade HIV and AIDS has become a huge socio-economic challenge. Attitudes towards people with disability appear to be changing to become more inclusive but there is still evidence that many are still on the fringes of society. There are strong policy statements on the provision of special education. Policy has moved to an inclusive model but practice lags in the field. Most provision for children with special educational needs is at units for particular categories of disability attached to ordinary schools. The majority of these are at primary schools. There is a drive to build support for pupils in the ordinary school and classroom. This is slow in developing but might speed up in the near future as all newly trained teachers now have elements of special needs education as part of their initial training. Non-governmental organizations play a key role in pre school and vocational training for students with special needs and also in provision for hearing impairment. However they struggle with funding and staff training. Issues of poor coordination between key stakeholders, a lack of curriculum development and a shortage of specialist staff all conspire to limit the effectiveness of provision. There have been a number of studies made that highlight these issues and suggest improvements that could be made.... [more]


IMPROVING THE WRITING SKILLS OF HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES USING THE EXPRESSIVE WRITING PROGRAM 2007 22 2 145 KB
Barbara D. Walker, Margaret E. Shippen, David E. Houchins and David F. Cihak Marietta City Schools, Auburn University, Georgia State University, The University of Tennessee

This study investigated the effects of the Direct Instruction writing program, Expressive Writing (Engelmann & Silbert, 1983), for high school students with learning disabilities (LD). The study used a multiple probe design across participants and results indicate the effectiveness of Expressive Writing in improving the writing skills of high students with LD who participated. The study (a) examined the number of correct word sequences written during the first three minutes of narrative writing opportunities, (b) analyzed the incorrect word sequences by error type (e.g., spelling, use of Standard English, punctuation, capitalization), and (c) examined the generalization effects of Expressive Writing on performance on a standardized measure of writing skills. This study has implications for the practical use of the Expressive Writing program to improve overall written expression as well as pre-skills such as spelling, mechanics, and Standard English usage.... [more]


A QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF THE BEHAVIORAL CHECKLIST OF THE MOVEMENT ABC MOTOR TEST 2007 22 2 188 KB
Luis Miguel Ruiz, Marta Gómez, Jose Luis Graupera, Melchor Gutiérrez and José Luis Linaza University of castilla La Mancha. Toledo, la Poveda Secondary School. Madrid, University of Alcalá de Henares

The fifth section of the Henderson and Sugden´s Movement ABC Checklist is part of the general Checklist that accompanies The Movement ABC Battery. The authors maintain that the analysis of this section must be mainly qualitative instead of quantitative. The main objective of this study was to employ a quantitative analysis of this behavioural checklist with a Spanish sample of 1,128 school children that were assessed by their physical education teachers. Teachers applied this Behavioural Section in its Spanish version to children and the analysis of the data showed an orthogonal two-factor solution with high internal consistency. These factors were labeled: Impulsiveness and Passiveness. This quantitative version was applied in studies about clumsiness and demonstrated that this checklist is a user-friendly instrument for physical education children.... [more]


EXPLORING THE ROLE OF `SPECIAL UNITS´ IN CYPRUS SCHOOLS:A CASE STUDY 2007 22 2 129 KB
Panayiotis Angelides and Antonia Michailidou Intercollege, Cyprus

One of the provisions of the law for special education in Cyprus is for children considered as having special needs to be educated in `special units´. The purpose of this study is to investigate and observe the way that `special units´ function in the educational environment in Cyprus, paying particular attention to one unit in which five children categorized as having special needs study. In particular, this paper studies the ways in which the different stakeholders (teachers, head-teacher, peers) treat the children of the special unit, as well as, how these children say they, feel in the school environment. The results show that the existence of the `special unit´ and the way it functioned amounted to problematic situations and acted as marginalization factor for the children who attended it.... [more]


PRIMARY MAINSTREAM TEACHERS´ ATTITUDES TOWARDS INCLUSION OF STUDENTS WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS IN THE PRIVATE SECTOR: A PERSPECTIVE FROM DUBAI 2007 22 2 169 KB
Eman Gaad & Lavina Khan British University in Dubai

One of the main challenges facing primary mainstream teachers in Dubai in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) stems from the current educational movement towards inclusion. It is an international phenomenon, a process that emphasizes providing special education services to students with special educational needs within the regular classrooms. The purpose of the study was to identify perceptions about educating students with special educational needs in the mainstream education setting. The researchers examined the issue of inclusive education and the attitudes towards inclusion among the primary mainstream teachers in Dubai in the large private sector. The study was also designed to identify whether these teachers perceived themselves capable of adapting to what inclusion requires. The study relied on qualitative methods. Questionnaires were given to primary mainstream teachers working in two large private schools in Dubai. Additionally teachers were interviewed too. All teachers involved in the study are expatriates. An analysis of data collected indicated that primary mainstream teachers in Dubai in the private sector favour traditional special education service delivery models over full inclusive practices. These teachers felt students with special educational needs lack skills needed to master the mainstream regular classroom course content. The teachers also expressed that the heavy teaching load in the mainstream classroom makes it hard to meet the needs of students with special educational needs in the private sector. However, results also indicated that teachers perceive additional training, support from administrators, and access to related services and resources as necessary in order to meet the needs of their students with special educational needs in the mainstream education setting. The study ended with research based recommendations for future practice.... [more]


SPECIAL EDUCATION IN THE BEDOUIN COMMUNITY IN ISRAEL`S NEGEV REGION 2007 22 2 160 KB
Iris Manor-Binyamini Ben Gurion University of the Negev

The purpose of this article is to present an overview of the special education sector of the Bedouin Arab community in southern Israel.. The paper opens with the study rationale and the importance of the subject. The review is based on a thematic analysis of content taken from diverse sources. The analysis showed five principle themes: (a) numerous Bedouin children with special needs and the ensuing social issues (b) Physical infrastructure (c) Skilled professional and multi-professional personnel (d) Methods, and adequate diagnostic, placement and interventional tools and (e) Additional assisting services. The analysis shows vast and numerous deficiencies vis-à-vis extant conditions and needs. It shows the necessity of an overall interventional program which will address diverse needs. At the end of the article I will propose Recommendations for future action emerging from the study adapted to the context and needs of the community; their main thrust relates to identifying all the Bedouin children with special needs, developing a professional- parent-community dialogue adapted to the needs of the community and devoting more attention to research of the subject.... [more]


EXPERIENCES OF KINDERGARTEN TEACHERS IMPLEMENTING INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES FOR DIVERSE LEARNERS 2007 22 2 206 KB
Marie Tejero Hughes and Diana Martinez Valle-Riestra University of Illinois at Chicago, Florida International University

The purpose of this study was to determine what instructional practices that enhance outcomes for diverse learners do kindergarten teachers see as desirable and feasible to implement and which do they report implementing in their general education classroom. Ninety-five kindergarten teachers were asked about their perceptions and use of instructional practices. A subgroup of 18 teachers also participated in a follow-up interview. Teachers rated the desirability of all practices high indicating their awareness and the importance of each. The most desirable practices reported by teachers primarily focused on practices surrounding the social-emotional domain of students. Although teachers rated the ease of doing most of the practices relatively high, this rating was lower in all cases from the desirability rating... [more]


DO CHILDREN WITH DOWN SYNDROME HAVE DIFFICULTY IN COUNTING AND WHY? 2007 22 2 154 KB
Hala Abdelahmeed Suez Canal University

A systematic review of literature in the area of counting in Down syndrome was conducted to identify and analyze ability to count of children with Down syndrome. We firstly reviewed the most famous theories which have explained how typically developing children acquire counting, and then we discussed how children with Down syndrome acquire counting according to these theories. We showed how children with Down syndrome have a deficit in counting and demonstrated the main reasons which may lie beneath this difficulty. Inspite of this difficulty in counting, we found that children with Down syndrome benefited from intervention. We ended the review by briefly summarizing the characteristics of good interventions to demonstrate how we can improve children with Down syndrome's ability to count.... [more]


LEADERSHIP CHALLENGE:BLENDING INCLUSIVE SPECIAL NEEDS PROVISION AND REFORM OF TEACHING METHODOLOGY IN A DUTCH INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL 2007 22 2 144 KB
Jill Sperandio and Judith Klerks Lehigh University

This article presents a case study of a state-funded international school in the Netherlands undertaking program reform. During the school year examined by the case study, the school was in the process of promoting the inclusion of children with special needs into its mixed ability classes, and diversifying and improving teaching and learning methodologies for all students. The study demonstrates how decisions made and implemented by the school leader and administration established a climate of inclusion, which aided program reform efforts that were focused on teaching methodologies.... [more]


THE DEVELOPMENT OF AN INSTRUMENT FOR MEASURING PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS´ SENTIMENTS, ATTITUDES, AND CONCERNS ABOUT INCLUSIVE EDUCATION 2007 22 2 183 KB
Tim Loreman, Chris Earle, Umesh Sharma and Chris Forlin Concordia University College of Alberta, Monash University, Hong Kong Institute of Education

This paper describes the development of an improved scale for measuring sentiments, attitudes and concerns about inclusive education in pre-service teachers based on an examination of data gathered from 996 pre-service teachers from five tertiary institutions using a modified version of the Interactions with People with Disabilities scale (Forlin, Jobling & Carroll, 2001; Gething, 1991, 1994), the Concerns about Inclusive Education Scale (Sharma & Desai, 2002), and the Attitudes Toward Inclusive Education Scale (Wilczenski, 1992, 1995). Based on the results of principal component analyses, conceptual judgments made by the research team, and a critique of content and format from an `expert group´, a new scale, the Sentiments, Attitudes and Concerns about Inclusive Education scale (SACIE), is developed. The rationale behind the development of the scale is discussed.... [more]