Volume: 22.1
Year: 2007

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:

Year 2016 Volume 31 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 3
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 1
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 3
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 1

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
University Positions Available 2007 22 1 28 KB
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Advertisements for positions at Honk Kong university... [more]


DOGMATIC INSULARITY IN LEARNING DISABILITIES CLASSIFICATION AND THE CRITICAL NEED FOR A PHILOSOPHICAL ANALYSIS 2007 22 1 90 KB
Stefan C. Dombrowski, Don Ambrose and Amanda Clinton California State University

The recent revision of the Individuals with Disabilities Act (Individual with Disabilities Education Improvement Act; IDEIA) in the United States (U.S.) has created the opportunity for an unprecedented change in the way in which learning disabilities (LD) are identified. As a result of this revision, intense and often polarizing debate has surfaced regarding models and methods relevant to classifying learning disabilities in children. This paper presents a philosophical/worldview framework developed to facilitate discussion among and limit dogmatic insularity within the field of LD diagnosis as it attempts to further delineate LD identification procedures. Identification of LD is discussed in relation to four root-metaphorical world views: mechanism, organicism, contextualism, and formism. Application of world view principles to discussion and debate regarding proposed LD classification models might help the field avoid entrapment within dogmatic, insulated, and limited perceptual frameworks that tend to marginalize competing models while magnifying strengths and minimizing (or inadvertently ignoring) weaknesses of a favored LD diagnostic model. This discussion is critical because learning disabilities comprises 51% of all special education diagnoses in the U.S.; yet, consensus has not been attained regarding the most appropriate LD diagnostic parameters... [more]


AN ANALYSIS OF THE EFFICACY OF A MOTOR SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAMME FOR YOUNG PEOPLE WITH MODERATE LEARNING DIFFICULTIES 2007 22 1 0 KB
Christopher M. Boyle University of Dundee

A secondary school for children with Moderate Learning Difficulties had requested assistance from psychological services for pupils that the school felt were experiencing poor motor-coordination and in some cases low self-esteem. An intervention programme for children with dyspraxic type difficulties (Portwood, 1999) was proposed as a suitable improvement programme for the children identified as being most in need of assistance (n=6). The programme ran for eighteen weeks (four weeks of the daily exercise programme, four weeks rest, and once again four weeks of the exercise programme). Pre and post-testing was carried out in the areas of speed of handwriting (Wallen et al., 1996) and general gross coordination improvement. It was deemed suitable to attempt to measure improvement with regards to speed of handwriting due to its relevancy in most facets of education. The results indicated that there was a significant level of improvement in the experimental group with regards to the speed of handwriting and also in general gross motor coordination. All members of the Video Review Panel felt that there were strong levels of improvement in the subjects (ranging from 45% to 65%). The participant staff members of the project school unanimously agreed that the intervention programme was worthwhile and that tangible benefits had been brought to both the children and the school as a result. Despite the small sample size, it was felt that there are implications for how children with moderate learning difficulties are viewed when improvement programmes are planned and implemented.... [more]


COMPARISON OF CRITICAL THINKING IN UNDERGRADUATES AND GRADUATES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 2007 22 1 109 KB
Victoria Zascavage, William G. Masten Jennifer Schroeder-Steward and Christopher Nichols Xavier University, Texas A&M University

This study assessed overall critical thinking ability in graduate and undergraduate students in special education at a southwestern university. A comparison of the two groups resulted in significant differences on the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal Form Short (WGCTA-FS) subscales for Inference, Recognition of Assumption, Deduction, and Total Critical Thinking. Conclusions amalgamate Council for Exceptional Children Standards for a Beginning Special Educator, Bloomīs Taxonomy, and the Critical Thinking Scale of the Watson-Glaser- FS. Findings reinforce the need for rigorous mentorship of the novice special educator and direct instruction for the pre service educator in critical thinking through participation in research coursework... [more]


THE EMERGENCE OF INCLUSION FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN UKRAINE 2007 22 1 202 KB
Sharon A. Raver Old Dominion University

Since independence in 1991, Ukraine has struggled with restructuring its Soviet style educational system. The process has been sluggish and fraught with tension, resistance, and set backs, mirroring Ukraineīs efforts to revamp its economy and regain productivity levels that characterized it prior to independence (Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs, 2003). One of the initiatives currently being discussed is integration of students with disabilities with their nondisabled peers in educational and social settings. The debate has prompted heated discussions and caused some to recommend a reexamination of the special education system (Zasenko, 2004). This article discusses some of the initial actions taken in this debate, and presents some of the pressing barriers that will have to be addressed to make inclusion a reality for Ukraineīs young people and citizens with special needs... [more]


IDENTIFYING A ROADMAP OF SUPPORT FOR SECONDARY STUDENTS IN SCHOOL-WIDE POSITIVE BEHAVIOR SUPPORT APPLICATIONS 2007 22 1 162 KB
Hank Bohanon, Lucille Eber Brigid Flannery and Pamela Fenning Loyola University, Illinois Positive Behavior Support Network and University of Oregon

The need for an increased understanding of secondary and tertiary supports within a school-wide positive behavior support framework in high schools is discussed. Outcome data such as discipline referrals sent to the office seem to indicate that school-wide applications of positive behavior support can decrease the proportion of students who require more intensive supports. While limited information is available on high school level supports, connections can be made with cutting edge research on self-determination and increased student participation in buy-in to the overall process. Connecting individualized supports to the overall curriculum of the schools appears to have implications for increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of supports in secondary school settings.... [more]


PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS IN EMPLOYMENT AND JOB RETENTION OF THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED IN THE UNITED STATES: A FUTURE CONCERN OF SPECIAL EDUCATION 2007 22 1 97 KB
Sakui W. G. Malakpa University of Toledo

Special education and rehabilitation services for the blind embody many benefits. Ultimately, however, such services ought to lead to employment because, like any persons, the blind and visually impaired derive many benefits from employment. Yet, access to jobs for people with severe vision problems is impeded by many factors. It is therefore necessary to empower such persons to gain and retain jobs. One means to this end is through the use of assistive technology... [more]


NORTHERN IRELAND STUDENT TEACHERSī CHANGING ATTITUDES TOWARDS INCLUSIVE EDUCATION DURING INITIAL TEACHER TRAINING 2007 22 1 162 KB
Jackie Lambe University of Ulster

With the passing of the Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Act into law alongside the move away from academic selection for post-primary pupils by 2008 and a far reaching review of the curriculum, education in Northern Ireland is about to face its most radical change in fifty years. Issues relating to Inclusive Education are now pressing and in addressing such change, it is recognized that pre-service programmes must be reviewed to ensure that student teachers are equipped to teach effectively in classrooms that may be very different from their own learning experience. This study seeks to discover the factors influencing student teachers changing attitudes towards inclusion during a one year Post-Graduate Diploma in Education. The findings reveal that positive attitudes towards inclusion were tempered by concern about personal competency to teach in an inclusive classroom and by continued attachment to the current system of academic selection with which they were familiar. The effect of a successful teaching practice in the non-selective sector had the most positive influence on perceived competency and on general attitudes towards inclusion. This research concludes that those responsible for pre-service education in Northern Ireland should ensure that school based experience is also underpinned with an effective programme of academic study about inclusion-based practices... [more]


A SURVEY OF GENERAL EDUCATION TEACHERS' KNOWLEDGE OF LEARNING DISABILITIES IN JORDAN 2007 22 1 95 KB
Jamal M. Al Khatib The University of Jordan

This study investigated the Jordanian regular education teachers' knowledge of learning disabilities and whether this knowledge differed as a function of selected variables. The sample consisted of 405 regular classroom teachers teaching 1st- to 6th- grade students in 30 schools in three Jordanian districts. Teachers completed a 40-item test designed by the researcher, which had adequate psychometric properties. T-tests for independent samples and ANOVA were used to analyze the survey data. The results of the study revealed that teachers had a moderate level of knowledge of learning disabilities. Female teachers were found to be significantly more knowledgeable than male teachers. Teachers' level of knowledge was unrelated to teachers' age, teaching experience, or academic qualifications. The implications of these findings for inclusion and for future research in Jordan are provided... [more]


PROJECT BASED LEARNING FOR CH?LDREN WITH MILD MENTAL DISABILITIES 2007 22 1 143 KB
Yildiz Guven and Hulya Gulay Duman University of Marmara

The aim of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of a project-based learning program delivered to children with mild mental disabilities. The 7 children (4 girls and 3 boys) selected for this experimental study were from an elementary school and attending a special class. The theme of the project was Patisserie. At posttest the group performed significantly better than at pretest in general and in all subtests (point to the patisserie, point to the foods/drinks, point to the workers, point to the things at the patisserie, what we give to the waiter before leaving and proper behavior at the patisserie). Results showed the importance of project-based learning for the children... [more]


IMPLEMENTATION OF ASSISTIVE COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY: A MODEL FOR SCHOOL SYSTEMS 2007 22 1 229 KB
Karen Morrison Special Education

Many researchers conclude that assistive computer technology (ACT) has the potential for improving educational outcomes and improving the quality of life for those with disabilities (Blackhurst & Edyburn, 2000; Fisher & Frey 2001; Lewis, 1993; Lindsey, 1993). While it is recognized that ACT can have a positive impact on learning for students with learning problems, the process for the integration of assistive technology into the curriculum is more complex. A well documented gap exits between the potential of ACT and the realities of the classroom (Edyburn, 2000, 2004; Zabala, 2006; Zabala et al., 2000). Educators need easy access to professionals with expertise in technology and pedagogy. Technology strategic planning is essential. This report reviews these factors and suggests a model to address the ACT implementation process... [more]


TEACHERīS VIEWS ON THE TEACHING OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES IN GHANAIAN CLASSROOMS 2007 22 1 125 KB
Cecilia Obeng Indiana University

The paper demonstrates that a majority of the students with disabilities in Ghanaian classrooms (in Accra and some rural areas in Eastern Region) did not have their disabilities detected or identified by professionals. The paper also shows that vision impairment is the most common problem reported by the teachers in the schools, especially in Accra. Also, most of the teachers did not have any training in teaching children with disabilities. This situation limits their capability of helping the children with disabilities meaningfully toward achieving their educational goals. The study also demonstrates that some teachers were not happy to have children with disabilities, especially those with behavior problems, because of their large classes. It is recommended that the Ghana Education Service makes Special Education courses a major component in the teacher-training curriculum in Ghana, and also appoints experts on children with developmental problems to organize workshops for teachers in order to increase teacher effectiveness in dealing with children with disabilities... [more]


SPECIAL EDUCATION TRAINING AND PRESERVICE TEACHERS 2007 22 1 115 KB
Azar Hadadian, and Linda Chiang Ball State University and Azusa University

The role of general education teachers is becoming critical for students with special needs. The purpose of this study was to obtain the perceptions of preservice teachers in order to prepare them for inclusive classrooms. Participants included graduate and undergraduate students (n=248) from two different universities. Results found experiences with students with disabilities did not enhance participantsī attitude to support inclusion. However, taking courses in special education did. Recommendations were made on further programming for preparing preservice general education teachers for inclusionary settings... [more]


DRAMA TECHNIQUES FOR THE ENHANCEMENT OF SOCIAL-EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN PEOPLE WITH SPECIAL NEEDS: REVIEW OF RESEARCH 2007 22 1 183 KB
D. Jindal-Snape & E. Vettraino University of Dundee

A systematic review was conducted of the research into the use of drama techniques to enhance social-emotional development of people with special needs. Only eight studies that were conducted in the period 1990-2005 met the criteria for inclusion in this review. The conclusions of the review were that there are indications that the dramatic processes have the potential to be effective in enhancing social-emotional development of people with special needs. However, the authors have not provided enough evidence to substantiate their claims. Further, there were several limitations in the studies, indicating the need for further research if the full potential of drama techniques is to be realized. On the basis of this analysis, this paper presents recommendations for future systematic and rigorous research in this area... [more]


DIGITAL VIDEO INTERVENTION WITH SPECIAL POPULATIONS:LOOKING FOR INHERENT QUALITIES 2007 22 1 165 KB
Penelope P. Orr Florida State University

How do art educators and special educators working with special needs students know what qualities exist in each medium that could set off a student or help them to control their own behavior? How does the educator determine what medium will be the most beneficial for each of their students? Many art educators would state that they know these things through experience in working with the materials and students, through trial and error, and by seeing how different populations respond to and work with these materials. Many art educators work on an intuitive level to make their choices, and some make choices based on what is available to them for use. This study explores a specific art media, digital video, to better inform special educators and art educators who are working with special needs students the beneficial aspects, drawbacks and educational strengths of digital video production for students with emotional, behavioral and learning disabilities. Through a preliminary survey to determine the inherent qualities of this media and a case study to provide an in-depth look at this media, this study explores how art educators/ special educators make decisions about when, why and how to use digital video with special populations... [more]


PRE-SERVICE EDUCATORSī ATTITUDES TOWARDS INCLUSIVE EDUCATION 2007 22 1 184 KB
Andile Mdikana, Sibusiso Ntshangase and Tokozile Mayekiso University of the Witwatersrand

The inclusion of learners with special educational needs in general education is becoming more prevalent. As a result various special education researchers have begun to examine the success of inclusion, as well as the attitudes and beliefs of general educators towards the inclusion of learners with disabilities in the general education classroom. In the present study, preservice educatorsī attitudes towards inclusive education were investigated. The participants are full time students of the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg. These students are registered for the Post Graduate Certificate in Education, B.Phys.ed) and B.A (Ed) and they are all in their final year of study. The students are mainly English-speaking. The sample comprises of 22 students seven males and fifteen females. Convenient sampling design was employed. A questionnaire developed by Choles (1997) was adapted and was used as a measuring instrument to record the responses of the research respondents. The adapted questionnaire comprised of the following sections: Biographical details, Attitudes towards inclusive education, Requirements for competency, Requirements for successful inclusion and Attitudes towards learners with Special Needs. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The research participants were generally found to have positive attitudes toward inclusive education. The results of this investigation are significant in the sense that the understanding of pre-service educatorsī attitudes is critical for the successful implementation of inclusive education (Mowes, 2000; Elloker, 1999; Gadium, 2002; Dover, 2002; & Mckeskey & Waldrom, 2002).... [more]


GENDER DIFFERENCES IN SELF-CONCEPT AMONG ADOLESCENTS WITH LOW VISION 2007 22 1 160 KB
Mohammed Al-Zyoudi Mu'tah University

This study aimed to investigate whether there were differences in self-concept among adolescents with low vision due to gender. The sample population consisted of (23) adolescents, 12 (10 males and 13 females) aged 12-17 years in the first year of secondary school. The researcher used the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (TSCS) for the evaluation of Self-Concept. The results of this study showed that there were some differences in the adolescents' self-concept and self-behavior due to gender. Female students scored lower on social self-concept, family self-behavior, and moral self-behavior dimensions than male students, but higher on physical self-concept... [more]


THE EFFICACY OF INTELLIGENCE TESTING IN CHILDREN WITH PHYSICAL DISABILITIES,VISUAL IMPAIRMENTS AND/OR THE INABILITY TO SPEAK 2007 22 1 153 KB
Cheryl Crisp Indiana University

Intelligence testing is an important part of any individualized education plan; however, a verbal test measure may not be appropriate for the child with a physical disability, visual impairment, and/or the inability to speak. A child with a physical disability may not be able to point accurately or build a tower with blocks; a child with a visual impairment may not be able to identify the colors in the small boxes contained in the test, and a child who is unable to speak may not have the same command of language as a peer who is able to speak. In order for schools and others to have an accurate depiction of the intelligence of a child with a disability, alternate testing methods may need to be employed. It is in the best interest of every child to have an adequate assessment to identify his/her individual educational needs. The purpose of this paper is to present the special needs of children with a physical disability, visual impairment, and/or the inability to speak and to propose some alternative testing methods to make testing more appropriate for these children... [more]