Volume: 21.2
Year: 2006

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:

Year 2016 Volume 31 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 3
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 1
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 3
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 1

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
SOCIAL PROBLEM SOLVING IN COOPERATIVE AND PROBLEMATIC CONTEXTS IN STUDENTS WITH AND WITHOUT ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER 2006 21 2 63 KB
Thienhuong N. Hoang California State Polytechnic University,

The social problem-solving capacities of students aged 9 to 12 years with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) (N=30) were compared to their non-ADHD peers (N=30) in hypothetical cooperative and problematic contexts. In the cooperative science task, the students with ADHD were more non-collaborative and less able to elaborate in response to their leaderīs proposal. The students with ADHD were more positive than their ambivalent non-ADHD peers at the prospect of cooperative group participation. When the problematic situation was presented, students were equally aggressive in response, the students with ADHD proposed more positive outcomes for perpetrator of the problem. Such studies of the more complex social and cognitive outcomes of ADHD are essential to progress their educational management beyond the current behavioral focus.... [more]


TURKISH MOTHERSī INTERPRETATIONS OF THE DISABILITY OF THEIR CHILDREN WITH MENTAL RETARDATION 2006 21 2 70 KB
Ibrahim H. Diken Anadolu University

The purpose of this paper was to understand how Turkish mothers make meaning of the disability of their children with Mental Retardation (MR). Thirteen Turkish mothers who had at least one child with MR were the participants of the study. A qualitative interpretive framework was used for collecting and analyzing the data. The data were gathered through semi-structured interviews. Mothersī beliefs on the nature, causation, and treatment of the disability of their children were the main focus of the interviews. Some parents did not believe their children had a disability or misunderstood the nature of disability. Although most were aware of their childrenīs developmental limitations, they, at the same time, perceived the condition of the disability as temporary. Both traditional and modern (bio-medical) beliefs were held by most of the mothers on the causation of the disability. Mothers identified traditional beliefs, especially the religious ones, as the most popular causal agents. Most mothers sought help from both modern and traditional agents. Mothers, who held strong traditional beliefs regarding the causation of the disability of their children, held strong traditional treatment beliefs and valued more traditional treatment practices rather than bio-medical ones. Among the traditional treatment practices, most mothers required help from religious agents. Regarding future expectations of Mothers on the situation of their children, mothers wanted their children be less independent, and for this reason, they sought a more individualized education for their children. Implications, limitations and directions for future studies are also discussed.... [more]


AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDERS AND PRIMARY-SECONDARY TRANSITION 2006 21 2 149 KB
D. Jindal-Snape, W. Douglas, K. J. Topping, C. Kerr. & E. F. Smith University of Dundee

Transition from primary to secondary school has been a focus of concern regarding pupil anxiety, social integration, lack of progression and under-achievement, particularly for children/young people with special educational needs (SEN). Previous studies often over-depended on data from professionals and treated all SEN as similar. This study gathered data specifically from children/young people with autistic spectrum disorders and their parents (contrasting this with the views of professionals), adopting a more intensive case study methodology. A large number of transition support arrangements were identified. In 4/5 cases the arrangements were delayed and/or incomplete, with a number of specific problems. Despite the size and complexity of their new school, the children/young people were positive about transition, but wanted real inclusion in school activities. Parental evaluations of transition arrangements were considerably lower than those of professionals. Stakeholder perceptions of what worked and did not work were contrasted. Commonalities and differences in the relevant development needs of school staff were identified. Implications for future research, policy and practice are explored... [more]


THE DEVELOPMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES IN THAILAND 2006 21 2 77 KB
Stacy L. Carter Mississippi State University

The government of Thailand has historically provided a limited number of educational opportunities for individuals with disabilities but has recently demonstrated movement toward a more comprehensive educational system. The educational policy has not only begun to expand the incorporation of services for children with disabilities but has also introduced efforts to include children with disabilities in regular education classrooms. This paper examines the development of the education system in Thailand with an emphasis on the development of special education programs... [more]


PROGRAMS AND METHODS TO IMPROVE READING COMPREHENSION LEVELS OF READING RESOURCE SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS AT AUSTIN ROAD MIDDLE SCHOOL 2006 21 2 134 KB
Brenton A. Stenson Georgia State University

This action research project made an attempt to increase the reading comprehension levels of special education reading resource students by raising academic efficacy through public acknowledgement of improvement, scaffolded instruction through the use of differentiated teacher created matrices, and graphic organizers to solidify the relationships between events in the reading passages. Academic efficacy increased 21% Pmore]... [more]


EDUCATIONAL SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH MENTAL RETARDATION IN KENYA 2006 21 2 103 KB
Mary W. Kiarie Southern Connecticut State University

Research pertaining to issues on educational services for individuals with disabilities in developing countries is scarce. The purpose of this article is to two fold: first, to contribute to the already existing literature, and, secondly, and perhaps more importantly, to provide a foundation for prospective readers to better understand literature regarding educational services for students with mental retardation. This article guides the reader to understand the perspectives towards students with mental retardation, discusses the definition and causes of this condition, and discusses issues pertaining to the identification, assessment and evaluation of these students in Kenya. The core of the article contains a discussion of the various placement options available for this population along with the curriculum in operation in the various settings. Existing barriers to effectively serving this population in Kenya and in other developing countries is also discussed.... [more]


TEACHERSī ATTITUDES TOWARDS INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN JORDANIAN SCHOOLS 2006 21 2 103 KB
Mohammed Al-Zyoudi Muītah University

The purpose of this study was to investigate teachersī attitudes towards inclusive education in Jordan, and the factors that influenced such attitudes. Qualitative research was used to gather information from all general education and special education teachers. The sample consisted of 90 teachers at 7 schools. The results of this study showed that teachersī attitudes were found to be strongly influenced by the nature and severity of the disabling condition presented to them, the length of teaching experience, and training... [more]


WHAT TEACHER CANDIDATES NEED TO KNOW ABOUT ACADEMIC LEARNING TIME 2006 21 2 130 KB
Rita Mulholland and Michelle Cepello California State University

A model assignment was designed and tested to enhance special education teacher candidatesī skills and understandingin order to improve student learning. The model includes university and school-site activities that develop teacher candidatesī awareness of the relationship between on-task learning time and student achievement. Teacher candidates (N=90) systematically gathered data on their own teaching behaviors and the learning behaviors of their students to measure the level of engaged teaching and learning. The process of guiding teacher candidates through the gathering, graphing, and analysis of student data is presented. Findings, as documented by candidatesī responses to the data, indicate the proposed assignment was successful in developing candidatesī understanding of the relationship between student achievement and on-task learning... [more]


ASSISTING PARENTS TO FACILITATE SOCIAL SKILLS IN YOUNG CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES THROUGH PLAY 2006 21 2 92 KB
Yanhui Pang Tennessee Technological University

This article introduces the negative effects of disabilities on young childrenīs play skill development, which also adversely affects their social interaction with peers and their independence. Strategies recommended by studies in addressing young childrenīs social skill improvement through play activity are introduced. Applicable and practical tips are summarized and provided for parents to use and help their young children improve social skills in natural environment together with real examples.... [more]


PRE-SERVICE TEACHERSī ATTITUDES, CONCERNS AND SENTIMENTS ABOUT INCLUSIVE EDUCATION: AN INTERNATIONAL COMPARISON OF THE NOVICE PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS 2006 21 2 169 KB
Umesh Sharma, Chris Forlin, Tim Loreman, and Chris Earle Monash Universit, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Concordia University College of Alberta

This study investigates the nature of concerns and attitudes held by pre-service teachers regarding inclusive education and their degree of comfort on interaction with people with disabilities. Pre-service training may be the optimal time to address educatorsī concerns and alter any negative attitudes about inclusive education. This paper reports the perceptions of pre-service teachers prior to their involvement in units of work focusing specifically on inclusive education in universities located in Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, and Singapore. Results indicate significant differences exist between the students in the eastern countries of Singapore and Hong Kong, and those in the western countries of Canada and Australia. Participants in the Western countries tended to have more positive sentiments and attitudes towards students with disabilities, and more concerns than their Eastern counterparts. The study also suggests that in most instances pre-service teachers have more positive attitudes towards people with disabilities and inclusion, and more confidence in implementing inclusive practice when they have had additional training and / or experience with people with disabilities.... [more]


SELF-MANAGEMENT FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: THE IMPORTANCE OF TEACHER FOLLOW-UP 2006 21 2 197 KB
Margaret E. King-Sears George Mason University

Researcher-teacher collaboration occurred during the design and implementation of self-management instruction for two middle school students with different disabilities and for two different target behaviors. One student with physical disabilities was taught to increase safe hall travel during school transitions, and the other student with learning disabilities was taught to increase on-task behaviors. After each student had been trained to use self-management, their teachers were not able to follow-up with them immediately. Contrary to their teacherīs anticipated impact of self-management, neither studentīs behaviors reached satisfactory levels until their teachers followed-up with them. Implications include the necessity for adults to follow-up with students after teaching self-management to ensure the intervention is progressing as planned and that the desired impact on studentsī behaviors occurs. The work described in this paper was funded by the U.S. Department of Education Field-Initiated Research Grant # H023C70066. The views expressed are the author's and do not necessarily represent the policy of that agency, and no endorsement by the federal government should be inferred. Immense appreciation is extended to the educators, Elena Dennis and Karen Cessna, for their significant time investment and valuable reflections in working with the researcher on these projects. Additional credit belongs to the research data collectors (Ted Crimy, Mary Keefer, Mary Gohng, and Sabita Raman), who were fastidious in gathering research data.... [more]


HIGH-FUNCTIONAL AUTISM: AN OVERVIEW OF CHARACTERISTICS AND RELATED ISSUES 2006 21 2 167 KB
Ann X. Huang and John J. Wheeler Tennessee Technological University

Individuals with high-functioning autism are characterized by almost normal language ability and intelligence as well as social, pragmatic impairments. Before the 1980s, limited research was focused on this disorder. This paper reviews previous research on this underserved population with a hope that we are able to gain some insights from existing literature and seek directions for future research. The definition and diagnostic criteria for high-functioning autism are addressed first, and then followed by an overview of the characteristics of these individuals and its relationship with Aspergers syndrome. Finally, research on the social/emotional well being of individuals with this disorder will be introduced as will research on theory of mind and other related research in the fields of neuroscience and cognitive science.... [more]


IT WAS WRITTEN ALL OVER HIM: CLASSROOM TEACHERSī REFERRAL CRITERIA FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION SERVICES 2006 21 2 192 KB
Michael W. Dunn Washington State University

A contextual understanding of general education classroom teachersī reasons for a studentīs referral for special education services provides insight into this initial step in the identification process. The philosophy of social constructivism (Bruner, 1987; Freedman & Combs, 1996; Vygotsky, 1978) provides a backdrop for the underlying practices and beliefs which render the participants in this study to employ the referral criteria that they use. Thirteen general education elementary teachers in a suburban city in southern Ontario were interviewed about their referral criteria for special education services. The results of this study indicated a combination of student characteristics that teachers observed (inattention, lack of comprehension, inability to complete tasks in the allotted time, and poor test performance) and what teachers inferred (e.g., about the way a student looks). The implications of the research for classroom and special education practices in particular are discussed.... [more]


A COMPARISON OF EMOTIONS ELICITED IN FAIR AND UNFAIR SITUATIONS BETWEEN CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT BEHAVIOUR PROBLEMS 2006 21 2 302 KB
Gillian Averill-Roper and Julia J. Rucklidge University of Canterbury

This study compared emotions, assessed during fair and unfair situations, between children (aged 8 to 11) with and without behaviour problems, controlling for SES, depression, anxiety, IQ and educational achievement in order to study the relationship between emotional responses and subclinical antisocial behaviours. Group allocation was determined by parent and teacher reports on the CBCL and the Connersī Rating Scales. Participants imagined themselves in six scenarios (two unfair, two fair and two neutral) where they were either punished or not punished and then rated different emotions from 1 to 7. Emotions varied significantly by group depending on the type of scenario presented. The unfair scenario with a positive outcome for the participant produced the greatest group differences with the behavioural group reporting emotions consistent with antisocial theory such as less guilt, anger and fear, and more pride and happiness than the controls. The results are discussed in terms of early interventions... [more]