Volume: 18.1
Year: 2003

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:

Year 2016 Volume 31 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 3
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 1
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 3
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 1

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
THE DIFFERENTIAL EFFECTS OF SKIP COUNTING AND PREVIEWING ON ACCURACY AND FLUENCY OF MATH FACTS WITH MIDDLE SCHOOL CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES 2003 18 1 40 KB
T. DuVall, T. McLaughlin & G. Cooke Sederstrom Gonzaga University

This study evaluated the effectiveness of Precision Teaching techniques, skip counting, previewing, and prompting on the accuracy and fluency of see to write math facts with three middle school students identified as learning disabled. An ABCD time series design was employed. The intervention package did improve the students' accuracy and fluency for see to write math facts for two of the students. Unfortunately, the goal of 80 digits per minute for three consecutive days was not achieved with any student. The applicability of skip counting for middle school students is discussed.... [more]


PIONEERING AND BUSINESS DISCOURSES IN SOUTH AFRICA'S EDUCATION WHITE PAPER 6: SPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATION 2003 18 1 78 KB
B.vanRooyen & L. LeGrange University of Stellenbosch

In this article we (de)construct pioneering and business discourses in South Africaīs recently published White Paper on special needs education. In particular, we (de)construct objects, agents, action and binaries constituted by these discourses as well as the voices they marginalize. We discuss the implications that pioneering and business discourses, as we deconstruct it in White Paper 6: Special Needs Education, have for inclusion/exclusion.... [more]


IN QUEST OF A SPECIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMME FOR DEMOCRATIC SCHOOL GOVERNANCE IN SOUTH AFRICA 2003 18 1 82 KB
F.Adams & Y.Waghid University of Stellenbosch

Since the promulgation of the South African Schools Act of 1996 the national Department of Education assumed that democratic school governance would transform schools into sites of constructive community involvement. Crucial decision-making responsibilities have devolved from central government to self-governing school communities, incorporated into School Governing Bodies (SGBs). Unfortunately this has not been the case thus far. This article explores current practices of SGBs in selected schools in the Grassy Park area of the Western Cape. It seeks to demonstrate that most school governors from amongst parents lack critical, linguistic and managerial skills to successfully implement idealistic policies as espoused in the Act, thus enhancing the need for a special education programme which could augment the knowledge and skills levels of these governors.... [more]


HEMISPHERICITY MODES, LEARNING STYLES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PREFERENCES OF STUDENTS IN AN INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSE 2003 18 1 104 KB
J.vander Jagt, R. Ramasamy, R.Jacobs, C. Ghose & J. Lindsey Southeastern Louisiana University, Florida Atlantic University & Southern University

It was the purpose of this study to determine if a selected sample of preservice teachers had different brain hemispheric processing modes, learning styles, and environmental preferences. The population for this study was 89 students enrolled in an undergraduate introductory special education course at a doctoral level university in Florida. Forty-four (44) of the students were selected using a systematic random sampling procedure to participate as subjects. Between-subjects (e.g., Gender, Ethnicity, Predominant Geographic Area, Laterality, and Major) and within-subjects (e.g., PEPS Environmental Preferences) designs were used to conduct the study. Dependent variables included the subjects' Hemispheric Mode Indicator, Learning Style Inventory, and Productivity Environmental Preference Survey findings and selected responses on a researcher-developed questionnaire. SPSS/PC+ 7.5 descriptive and inferential statistical procedures were used to analyze the data. Null hypotheses were tested at the .05 alpha level. Results indicated that subjects had different hemisphericity modes, preferred left and right processing, and their hemisphericity was associated with their predominant geographic area (urbanites preferred right mode processing while suburbanites preferred left). Subjects also had different learning styles, tended to be assimilators, accommodators, and convergers, but their learning styles were not associated with their gender, ethnicity, predominant geographic area, laterality, and major. Finally, subjects had different environmental preferences (e.g., noise level), and gender, ethnicity, and laterality affected these preferences.... [more]


SUBJECTIVE PERCEPTIONS OF STRESS AND COPING BY MOTHERS OF CHILDREN WITH AN INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY: A NEEDS ASSESSMENT 2003 18 1 55 KB
F.Hill, R.Newmark & L.LeGrange University of Stellenbosch

The principle aim of this study was to explore the feelings of and coping strategies used by a group of twelve mothers of young children with an intellectual disability. The study was part of a broad needs analysis investigation assessing quality of life for persons with an intellectual disability at different developmental stages. The present study had in mind quality of life of mothers with younger (pre-school) children with an intellectual disability. The participants completed two validated questionnaires, after these had been refined for the context of the study by a pilot group. At a later stage, a semi-structured interview was conducted with each research participant. The study found that the research participants experienced a range of feelings associated with having a child with an intellectual disability, including denial and anger, fear and hope for the future, fear of social rejection, guilt, sadness, joy and pride. The participants made use of a combination of different coping strategies, a pragmatic coping style being common to all. The other coping strategies assessed included wishful thinking, stoicism, seeking social and emotional support, and passive acceptance. The study concluded by noting that the participants make good use of the limited supports available, that professional support needs to be individualised, and mothers of young children need to be encouraged to empower themselves to provide one another with support.... [more]


FLASH CARD ERROR DRILL, PREVIEWING AND PRAISE FOR SEE TO SAY SIGHT WORDS WITH A YOUNG STUDENT WITH MILD MENTAL RETARDATION 2003 18 1 39 KB
H.Gerding & T.McLaughlin Gonzaga University

The purpose of this research was to increase the rate of see-to-say sight words in context (oral reading) using flash cards. The participant was a seven year old male with mild mental retardation. The number of correct and error words read were measured. The participant was reading below grade level, but higher than most of his classmates. The effectiveness of flash card drill with previewing was evaluated in an ABCD single case design. The overall outcomes indicated an increase in corrects and a decrease in errors. The benefits for teachers and student of using previewing and error drill are detailed.... [more]


THE EFFECTS OF PRECISION TEACHING TECHNIQUES AND FUNCTIONAL COMMUNICATION TRAINING ON PROBLEM BEHAVIOUR FOR A 12-YEAR OLD MALE WITH AUTISM 2003 18 1 49 KB
T.Solis, K.Mark Derby & T.McLaughlin Gonzaga University

This study considers the effectiveness of Precision Teaching techniques and Functional Communication Training on problem behavior. The participant, Terrence, was a nonverbal 12 year-old male with developmental delays and a diagnosis of autism. The studentīs problem behaviors involved pounding tables and mouthing. Pounding was defined as hitting a clenched fist on a desk or table top, a counter, his thigh, his head, or any other object nearby such as a toy as well as using his feet to kick into the air, on the ground, or at an object or person. Mouthing involved placing the collar of his shirt, his fingers, whole hand, or toes, and other objects such as pens and toys in his mouth. This experiment was conducted with the hypothesis that some child behavior problems may actually be a nonverbal means of communication. The effectiveness of functional communication training with a picture exchange system was examined using an AB single design. The data indicated that the participant was escape maintained. Functional communication training reduced the child's rate of aberrant behaviors. Suggestions for future research are made.... [more]


THE SOCIAL-BEHAVIOURAL DIFFICULTIES ASSOCIATED WITH NONVERBAL LEARNING DISABILITIES: SOME SUGGESTIONS FOR EDUCATORS 2003 18 1 87 KB
C.Caletti & T.McLaughlin Gonzaga University

This paper examines learning disabilities, the social-behavioral problems associated with learning disabilities, and available resources to help educators and parents deal with these problems. Children with learning disabilities have very unique educational needs. They tend to have accompanying social-behavioral difficulties as well. Educators that work with these children must be knowledgeable of the different strategies and techniques available for dealing with and helping correct their unique social-behavioral needs. The various social-behavioral problems seen most commonly in learning disabled children are examined to help provide better understanding for special educators and regular educators alike.... [more]


THE EFFECTS OF FIVE MINUTE PRACTICE, UNLIMITED PRACTICE, WITH SAFMED CARDS ON CORRECT AND ERROR RATE IN MATHS FACTS FOR TWO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES 2003 18 1 48 KB
J.Casey, T.McLaughlin, K.Weber & M.Everson Gonzaga University

This study evaluated the effectiveness of three Precision Teaching techniques daily timing, modeling at the top of the timed tests, and SAFMEDS (say all facts one minute each day shuffled) on the fluency of see to write math facts with two elementary school students identified as learning disabled. A modified ABCA single case design was employed. The various interventions packages did improve the students' correct rate and for see to write multiplication math facts for the participants. The applicability of various intervention procedures for elementary school special education students is discussed.... [more]


AN EVALUATION OF AN IN-SCHOOL AND HOME BASED TOILET TRAINING PROGRAM FOR A CHILD WITH FRAGILE X SYNDROME 2003 18 1 48 KB
M.McManus, K.Mark Derby & T.McLaughlin Gonzaga University

In the current case example, we implemented a treatment that improved the toileting skills of a 6 year-old-boy diagnosed with Fragile X Syndrome. The treatment program was implemented in a self-contained special education classroom at a local elementary school. A four-phase investigation was completed, which included a 2 week baseline, a two part 15 week treatment, and a follow-up assessment. During Phase 1, we conducted a preference assessment to determine potential stimuli to serve as reinforcers and gathered baseline data. For initial treatment we also slowly increased the amount of liquid the subject consumed and reached 8 ounces per session by week 8 of the program, which resulted in an increase of toilet usage. Finally in the last phase of treatment, the food edible was gradually faded. During phase 4, a follow-up probe in the participant's home setting was completed three years after the formal collection of data. Overall our results demonstrated that a toilet training treatment could be instituted in the school setting. The long-term follow up data indicated that the increases in toileting were maintained at school and home. The present findings also replicate the previous behavioral research on toileting.... [more]


EMERGENT LITERACY PROCEDURES AMONG PARENTS OF PRESCHOOL CHILDREN WITH AND WITHOUT DISABILITIES 2003 18 1 165 KB
B.Weikle & A.Hadadian Indiana University-Purdue University and Ball State University

The study examined the literacy practices, general resources, and technological tools being used by parents (N=392) to promote literacy at home. The primary purpose was to determine if differences existed in the literacy practices used by parents of preschool children with and without disabilities. Age and education of parents were also examined for any effect upon the literacy practices utilized by parents. The finding of this research supports the differences in the literacy practices among the two groups of parents. Parents of preschool children without disabilities used general literacy practices and technological literacy practices with greater frequency than did the parents of preschool children with disabilities. Further, parents of typically developing children reported the need for more technological tools and resources while parents of preschool children with disabilities reported that more information on specific skill development was needed. Recommendations for future directions are discussed.... [more]