Volume: 17.2
Year: 2002

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:

Year 2016 Volume 31 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 3
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 1
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 3
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 1

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
(DE)CONSTRUCTIONS OF FUNCTIONALIST DISCOURSES IN SOUTH AFRICAS EDUCATION WHITE PAPER 6: SPECIALS NEEDS EDUCATION 2002 17 2 96 KB
Brenda van Rooyen, Lesley Le Grange and Rona Newmark University of Stellenbosch

In this article we (de)construct functionalist discourses in South Africa´s recently published White Paper on special needs education. We particularly (de)construct objects, agents, action and binaries constituted by the medical/special needs discourse as well as the voices this discourse marginalises. We discuss the implications that the medical/special needs discourse, as we (de)construct it in White Paper 6: Special Needs Education, has for inclusion/exclusion.... [more]


INCLUDING STUDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES IN GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOMS: EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS 2002 17 2 86 KB
Jennifer Katz and Pat Mirenda University of British Columbia

The goal of this review is to examine the educational outcomes of inclusion for students with and without developmental disabilities in the early grades, including studies that have measured both traditional academic outcomes (e.g. literacy, mathematics, etc.) and non-academic skill development in areas such as basic life skills (e.g. communication, motor skills, functional life skills). We also review the research literature related to teaching techniques and educational contexts that have been found to promote effective inclusion (i.e., to provide optimal learning for all students, both with and without developmental disabilities).... [more]


INCLUDING STUDENTS WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES IN GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOMS: SOCIAL BENEFITS 2002 17 2 88 KB
Jennifer Katz and Pat Mirenda University of British Columbia

In recent years, the educational systems in North America and elsewhere have undergone significant educational reforms, including a movement toward the inclusion of students with disabilities in regular education classrooms. There is currently an extensive body of research investigating the social effects of inclusion, particularly with regard to students with developmental disabilities. The goal of this review is to summarize the research specifically related to the social benefits of inclusion in elementary school classrooms for both students with and without disabilities. This information should be useful to teachers, administrators, parents, and others who support such students in educational settings.... [more]


THE SCHOOL AS PUSH-FACTOR: PERSPECTIVES FROM THE LITERATURE 2002 17 2 63 KB
A.G. Smit and L. Liebenberg-Siebrits University of Stellenbosch

The following article provides a literature review of the problems presenting themselves to children from high-risk communities when attending school. The ways in which schools contribute to the decision of many of these children to drop out are highlighted and discussed against the background of the context of children living in high-risk communities. In doing so, the article illustrates the need for a new awareness amongst teachers of the needs of these learners, as well as improved training of educators and the establishment of facilitary programmes for both teachers and pupils within communities in order to address current shortcomings within established schooling systems.... [more]


THE SCHOOL AS PUSH-FACTOR: PERSPECTIVES FOR TEACHERS 2002 17 2 73 KB
A.G. Smit and L. Liebenberg-Siebrits University of Stellenbosch

The following article attempts to correlate existing literature on the role of schools in a child's decision to abandon schooling and home for a life on the streets, with experiences from an existing project in sub-economic communities of Cape Town. The article establishes the environment from which these children come and uses this as a setting for the environment that these children then encounter at school. By balancing these two settings against each other, the authors show how high-risk environments combined with schooling lacking in empathy, pushes children onto the streets. The article then concludes with a suggested role that schools could play in the lives of children from high-risk communities and a case example in the form of the project from which the article originates.... [more]


CHALLENGES IN INFANT MENTAL HEALTH:MEETING THE TRAINING NEEDS OF PARENTS AND PROFESSIONALS IN EARLY INTERVENTION 2002 17 2 61 KB
D.F.Perry, C.M.Sherwood-Puzzello, A.Hadadian and S.A.Wikerson Georgetown University, Indiana University, Ball State University and Purdue University

Families raising young children with disabilities face a variety of stressors that may result in an increased risk for mental health problems. Early intervention providers are charged with meeting the developmental needs of young children with disabilities, including infants´ and toddlers´ mental health needs in partnership with families. Partnerships between parents and providers may be strengthened by their participation in workshops on topics of mutual interest. A survey was developed and distributed to a statewide, random sample of parents and providers in order to assess the joint infant mental health training needs of parents and providers enrolled in Indiana´s early intervention system. Survey data from 535 parents and 627 service providers were compared along several dimensions. Parents and providers indicated high levels of interest in additional training related to all four domains of infant mental health: attachment, stress/coping, behavior, and regulation/adaption. However, families preferred to learn directly from their providers while providers preferred to attend conferences and workshops geared toward their level of experience and expertise. These findings challenge policy makers to develop different strategies to meet the unique infant mental health training needs of parents and providers in early intervention systems.... [more]


AUTISM: CHARATERISTICS, CAUSES AND SOME EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTIONS 2002 17 2 76 KB
Sheri Perko and T.F.McLaughlin Gonzaga University

Autism is a behaviorally defined disorder which occurs within the first three years of life. Autism is a life-long, complex, and severe disorder. Children with autism have many common characteristics. Language delay is one of the most significant and serious characteristics of students with autism. They also often experience abnormal responses to sensations, relate to people and objects in abnormal ways, and have disturbed social skills. The causes of this disorder are still unknown but researchers have made significant progress. Past theories of blaming the parents have been replaced by theories about differences in autistic persons neurological and brain systems. Educating students with autism presents a challenge to special education teachers. Many effective technologies have been developed to ensure that these students can function adequately in society. Overcoming stimulus overselectivity and a lack of motivation are just as important as teaching these students academic skills.... [more]


COMPARISON OF DRAPP AND FCT DURING TREATMENT AND EXTINCTION CONTINGENCIES 2002 17 2 38 KB
Chau Vu, K. Mark Derby, M. Auvil, C. Hanks, M. Babb, A. McGee, and T. F. McLaughlin Gonzaga University

Functional analysis treatments incorporate two components: (a) reinforcement of appropriate behavior, and (b) extinction or mild punishment for inappropriate behavior. However, a number of questions have emerged concerning: (a) which alternative behaviors should be incorporated into treatment, and (b) the sequential effects of treatment. In the present investigation, the effects of reinforcing a mand (i.e., Functional Communication Training) and task compliance (i.e., Differential Reinforcement of Appropriate behaviors) were compared. In addition, we evaluated the effects of an extinction schedule following a period of successful treatment for both FCT and DRApp. Overall, both treatments were found to reduce aberrant behavior effectively.... [more]


AN ANALYSIS OF THE ERRORS MADE BY INTELLECTUALLY DISABLED STUDENTS WHEN ATTEMPTING TO IDENTIFY NUMERALS FROM 1 TO 9 2002 17 2 281 KB
James Hanrahan, Glenda Bernstein, Erika Franz McGill University

A set of irregularly written numerals taken from teacher-prepared handouts and a set of numerals taken from a mathematics text for children were presented to a sample of eighty-seven intellectually disabled students attending a special education school in the greater Montreal area. These subjects were required to identify each numeral in both sets. The majority of subjects made at least one error in their attempts to identify the numerals from both sources. Most of the errors occurred with the teacher-made numerals, e.g. confusing numbers for letters... [more]


THE USE AND EVALUATION OF COPY, COVER, AND COMPARE WITH REWARDS AND A FLASH CARDS PROCEDURE WITH REWARDS ON DIVISION MATH FACTS MASTERY WITH A FOURTH GRADE GIRL IN A HOME SETTING 2002 17 2 0 KB
Sheila Stone, T. F. McLaughlin and Kimberly P. Weber Gonzaga University

An in-home comparison between the Copy, Cover, and Compare + rewards and flash cards + rewards method of teaching division facts to a fourth grade participant with difficulties in math was examined. The interventions were evaluated with a multiple baseline design across problem lists. The results indicated tha both the Copy, Cover, and Compare method and Flash Cards were successful in increasing correct rate and decreasing errors. These differences were statistically significant. Pre- and posttest data from a list of 90 division math facts revealed a large increase in participant performance. Some generalization of skill acquisition on daily tests was also noted after Copy, Cover, and Compare was introduced. The practical implications of employing these methods with in-home instruction are discussed... [more]


THE USE AND EVALUATION OF A SOUND OUT OR ERROR ONLY SOUND OUT PROCEDURE ON THE SPELLING PERFORMANCE OF A THIRD GRADE STUDENT 2002 17 2 50 KB
Rowena Dagdag, T. F. McLaughlin and Kimberly P. Weber Gonzaga University

A comparison of sound out procedure on all words in a word list with or without error drill was used to examine the effects on the spelling of a third grade student. Two interventions were evaluated using an ABC design. The results indicated that both procedures were successful in increasing corrects and decreasing errors in spelling and showed statistically significant differences. Follow up statistical tests found a significant difference favoring error drill for both corrects and errors. The practical implications of employing error drill and other self-correction methods are discussed... [more]