Volume: 17.1
Year: 2002

Directions:

1. Select articles from one of the following issues:

Year 2016 Volume 31 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 3
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 2
Year 2015 Volume 30 No 1
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 3
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 2
Year 2014 Volume 29 No 1
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 3
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 2
Year 2013 Volume 28 No 1
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 3
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 2
Year 2012 Volume 27 No 1
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 3
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 2
Year 2011 Volume 26 No 1
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 3
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 2
Year 2010 Volume 25 No 1
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 3
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 2
Year 2009 Volume 24 No 1
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 4
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 3
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 2
Year 2008 Volume 23 No 1
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 3
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 2
Year 2007 Volume 22 No 1
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 3
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 2
Year 2006 Volume 21 No 1
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 2
Year 2005 Volume 20 No 1
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 2
Year 2004 Volume 19 No 1
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 2
Year 2003 Volume 18 No 1
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 2
Year 2002 Volume 17 No 1
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 2
Year 2001 Volume 16 No 1

2. Click on [more] at the end of the abstract of the article you wish to read

Title Year Vol. No. Size
INCLUSIVE EDUCATION IN A RURAL CONTEXT IN SOUTH AFRICA: EMERGING POLICY AND PRACTICES 2002 17 1 140 KB
Nithi Muthukrishna University of Natal

Policy and legislation pertaining to special needs education in South Africa has been undergoing transformation since the democratic government came into power in 1994. The various policy documents that have emerged have stressed the principles of human rights, social justice, quality education for all, the right to a basic education; equality of opportunity, and redress of past educational inequalities. The most important development has been the emerging paradigm shift from the notion of learners with special needs to the concept of barriers to learning and participation, and the recommendation for a community based inclusive education agenda. This paper will firstly, examine this paradigm shift in special needs education in South Africa, and secondly, it will provide insight into a collaborative action research project in the province of KwaZulu-Natal that draws on emerging policy and aims at developing inclusive education practices within a cluster of schools in a rural district.... [more]


SILENT VICTIMS: EMOTIONAL ABUSE AND NEGLECT OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES 2002 17 1 40 KB
Sally M. Rogow

Abuse is a violation of fundamental human rights and affects all aspects of childrenīs development. Physical assault and sexual abuse are commonly identified, but the nature of the emotional abuse to which children with disabilities are vulnerable has not been widely recognized. Abuse results from denial of emotional nurturance, education and treatment as well as rough handling, use of restraints and isolation. A holistic and integrated approach is needed to bring children within the boundaries of ordinary protective services and provide effective protective and prevention services.... [more]


DISABILITY AND THE IDEOLOGY OF PROFESSIONALISM 2002 17 1 51 KB
Marie Schoeman Gauteng Department of Education Marinus Schoeman University of Pretoria

This paper was delivered at ISEC 2000 in Manchester, United Kingdom. It looks into the causes of exclusion of disabled children and their families from ordinary community life. The voices of parents of disabled children from impoverished rural South African contexts are heard who have not had access to any form of support because support had been organised in such a way that only children who had been labelled by professionals had access to it. It shows that professional roles and service models adopted from the West are inappropriate to the needs of developing societies. The ideology of professionalism developed in the welfare state has become the primary obstacle to alleviate the problems that persons with disability and their families are facing in their daily struggles to make their lives meaningful and worth living. At the root of the welfare state there is a tendency to define social problems in medical terms - the so-called therapeutic approach. This is the prerequisite for stripping individuals of their citizenship and permanently relegating them to an inferior caste of clients. Clients cannot develop the capacity to overcome or to cope with lifeīs challenges without professional assistance. Reforms are futile. The corrective required is the realization of the community vision. The central reform is the conversion of clients to citizens. The community vision seeks to reallocate power from the centralised and professionally dominated service system to neighbourhood associations. As opposed to the pseudo-community envisaged by human service professionals who seek to reduce all individuals to a uniform standard of normality, a heterogeneous community embodying individual diversity should be sought. If such a revolt occurs, it will not be either Left or Right, but predicated on a renunciation of professionalism and the cultivation of a populist faith in the ability of citizens to cooperatively govern their own lives. This will mean a definite move away from the welfare approach towards one of charity, the essence of which consists in a compassionate recognition of - and respect for - what James Hillman calls the world of chronic disorder. The mission changes into a transformation, not of the disorder, but of my norms of order. The authors are the parents of a 14 year old son with Down Syndrome.... [more]


THE EFFECTS OF CONTINGENCY CONTRACTING FOR A MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENT WITH ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER DURING CORRECTIVE READING LESSONS: A CASE REPORT 2002 17 1 60 KB
Alison M. Gurrad Kimberly P. Weber and T. F. McLaughlin Gonzaga University

The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the use of contingency contracting and a token program with an adolescent with ADHD. These data were gathered during Direct Instruction reading lessons in a middle school setting. The participant earned points for participating in the reading lessons. The contingency contract monitored number of participation points as well as interrupts. The overall outcomes indicated that interrupting behaviors decreased and participation improved when bonus points and contingency contacts were in effect. When the criterion for consequences was further reduced, the participantīs interruptions again declined. Changes in academic participation were less dramatic, but increases were found when contingency contracting was employed.... [more]


PORTFOLIO USE IN UNDERGRADUATE SPECIAL EDUCATION 2002 17 1 73 KB
M.A.Winzer University of Lethbridge

The course described in this paper attempted to bring disability from the margins to the core in order to help participants understand disability as a social phenomena. It stressed how the meanings of disability are created and perpetuated by a society, the social meanings and practices of disability, and how people interpret disability. Portfolios were used as one tool to provide a reference point to help students examine disability in new ways through a critical analysis of prevailing social perceptions. To reconstruct views of disability, common assumptions and beliefs about disability were challenged through an analysis of the portrayal of disabilities, through personal reflection, and through reading. Results indicate that the use of portfolios is one promising practice that can serve to modify beliefs so that teachers will become more responsive and accommodating.... [more]


PRESCHOOLERS WHO EXHIBIT ADHD RELATED BEHAVIORS: 2002 17 1 52 KB
Brandy Hundhammer and T.F. McLaughlin Gonzaga University

This paper will explore the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994), criteria for toddlers and preschoolers, the etiology of ADHD, assessment issues with young children, parent/teacher intervention plans, and medication. It will also illustrate why medication may not be an option for such young children. The research has shown it to be difficult to make a clear cut diagnosis of ADHD on such young children. This may be due to the childīs developmental course or stage of the child. There are many questions which arise regularly the early diagnosis as ADHD in young children. In treating young children, one must use behavior management strategies to help promote good parent behavior around the child, only promotes the best in everyone. Finally, more research is needed in this critical area in determining the outcomes for preschool children.... [more]


SIBLINGS OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES:A REVIEW AND ANALYSIS 2002 17 1 80 KB
Marsha Moore, Vikki Howard & T.F.McLaughlin Gonzaga University

The purpose of this paper was to present an overview of the literature and to evaluate the data, regarding sibling relationships between siblings with and without disabilities. A dynamic continuum has existed in the relationship between brothers and sisters, dependent upon differences within families and individuals and their respective level of development. Variables, such as age, gender, severity of the disability, family size and income, parental attitude and adjustment, and cultural and religious ideology interact and combine to produce multiple family responses to children with disabilities.... [more]


THE EFFECTS OF CODE- AND MEANING-EMPHASIS APPROACHES IN BEGINNING READING FOR STUDENTS WITH MILD DISABILITES 2002 17 1 251 KB
Mary Kaatz-Sulgrove, Stephanie M Peck and T F McLauglin Gonzaga University and Ohio State University

A comparison of the efficacy of code-emphasis and meaning emphasis approaches to reading instruction. Five students with mild disabilities participated and found the code-emphasis approach more effective.... [more]


A CIVIL SOCIETY PARTNERSHIP IN SPECIAL EDUCATION 2002 17 1 36 KB
Lesley LeGrange and Rona Newmark University of Stellenbosch

Post-apartheid policies provide enabling frameworks for inclusion of people with (dis)abilities into mainstream South African society. However, more inclusive processes of social engagement and participation on the part of persons with (dis)abilities require a collective effort from both government and civil society. In this article we examine what opportunities new policy frameworks provided for the establishment of a civil society partnership between the University of Stellenbosch and Down syndrome South Africa (DSSA). We contextualise our discussion within higher education transformation processes occurring both internationally and in South Africa.... [more]


SOCIAL ACCEPTANCE AT SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 2002 17 1 98 KB
Elizabeth Sparling University of Victoria

A qualitative study, consisting of a survey of 534 senior high students (Grade 9-12), was undertaken to determine factors that affect the social acceptance of students with moderate and severe disabilities at senior high school. The nature of the studentīs disability; social and cultural influences; teacher attitude and modelling; as well as, adolescent psychology and peer pressure are all cited as issues which impact inclusion. This study however, indicates that the overall factor appears to be a lack of knowledge and understanding, which are crucial to facilitate social acceptance and inclusion.... [more]